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ErikTheBearik

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A member registered Mar 11, 2019 · View creator page →

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The lack of this feature (along with a lack of print-on-demand) is holding a lot of indie physical game creators back from switching wholly over from DriveThruRPG to itch.io. 

An excellent game of vengeance. 10/10, would lure Fortunato with a bottle of wine and then seal him in the catacombs of the Montresor's again.

A powerful, excellent game.

Thank you! Something led me to check out your rules before I wrote these, and I took some inspiration, namely in the idea of discreet "actions" for the faction and special abilities tied into them.

These rules are intended to represent the directed antagonism against the PCs, rather than a vampire-on-vampire conflict, as to keep it "scoped down" a bit.

Recently, writing up rules / guidelines on how to prep a campaign or even a session seems to have kind of fallen out of vogue, and I'm starting to wonder if this is because people don't expect / don't want to be told how to prep a game session. In designing my own stuff, I've taken the position that prep rules are still good to have, even if people don't use them, but I've started to wonder lately if I've been going overboard. 

As a practical example, here's some rules I wrote up on how a GM could run a "GM Turn" between sessions of a Forged in the Dark game. I wanted to be thorough, designing it as a sort of mini-board game, but now I'm wondering if having so many rules devoted to the "lonely fun" of preparing a campaign will turn potential GMs off. As usual, any feedback / criticism is welcome, though they're mostly included to illustrate my larger point about Prep.

Agreed, with the caveat that I start writing games because I have to, it's the only way to get them out of my brain. I finish writing games because I force myself to.

Thanks a lot for the feedback! You pointed out a lot of useful stuff, I'll be making some changes.

Hi everyone, apologies in advance if this thread should have gone somewhere else. I figured since it's a forged-in-the-dark game, this would be the place to post.

I'm looking for feedback on my Forged in the Dark hack, Brinkwood, especially on the "Special Abilities" section for each "Mask," though any feedback is welcome. Masks are my version of playbooks, except they're change-able from score to score. Any feedback, comment, or critique is most appreciated!

Check here for the specific section: http://bit.ly/BW-MaskFeedback

Or here for the current game prototype: https://erikthebearik.itch.io/brinkwood

The best game about being gay and doing crimes that I've ever read.

Hey folklore-lovers! In doing research for our games, I thought it might be useful to share useful any useful resources we came across. 

Going first, I found this livestream WorldAnvil recently put up, interviewing a professor on anglo-saxon folklore and mythology. It isn't super specific to just England though, and she has some interesting insights into why people share and create folklore that I think might be more broadly useful. Take a look, hope it helps! https://www.twitch.tv/videos/400653592

Alright, first pass at the survey is complete! Please let me know if you feel anything should be added or removed. Also, if you don't mind, please share this survey far and wide so we can gather more data!

http://bit.ly/2TyMrHE

(3 edits)

Hello Folks, does anyone know if there is any survey data on people's play experiences with Blades in the Dark or it's hacks? I'm thinking about building out a survey for public consumption, but I'd rather not duplicate work if I can help it.

If no such survey exists, what sort of questions would you like to see on such a survey?

Edit:

My intent is to find (or, if there isn’t one, create) a public resource for Blades in the Dark hackers to get some solid data on what kinds of games people play with the system. If I end up creating one, I’d share the raw, anonymized data publicly along with any analysis I do of it. The survey would contain a disclaimer that the anonymized data would be publicly shared and an opt-out option for respondents that don't want their data publicly shared.

If anyone feels this intent is wrong-headed or that I’m making a mistake, please let me know!

Hey folks, I was wondering if people with more experience going on tabletop RPG podcasts and livestreams, either to promote a game, talk about design, or just to play some games, could talk a bit about how they got those opportunities. If aspiring designers want to get their games out there, is this a good way to do it? If so, what do they need to do, write, or talk to in order to find those opportunities?