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Neverdusk

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A member registered Jan 05, 2016 · View creator page →

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Got it, thanks for clarifying. I'll try screenshots for now. 

I absolutely love this! Would it be possible to implement a menu / export UI? Right now, I can't figure out how to save any of these maps - but I might be missing something obvious.

Is there any way to use the paid V2 assets with the character creator app (https://emily2.itch.io/sutemo)? I'd definitely be willing to buy them if that's the case. 

Nice to hear you enjoyed the music. Thanks!

Thanks for playing!

I'm glad you enjoyed the music!

I don't use Godot, but I ventured to try this (and maybe finally check out the engine), and I really like the concept. 

When I tried to use it, though, I ran into a bunch of issues: The startup screen didn't detect when I copy-pasted an install location, so I had to navigate to it manually. The settings screen seemed to reset its options every time I visited (and exiting settings didn't show the "Latest Download" section anymore). Also, pressing Download either did nothing or had an error - so I wasn't able to actually try it haha. I tried running with Administrator permissions, and it wouldn't download. I then tried creating another folder in my Downloads folder, just to test it, but I wasn't able to change my previous "installation location" in the app.

However, I think this has a ton of promise, and I'm not fully sure what issues may be on my side or with the app. If Godot doesn't already have something like this, then based on the screenshots, it could be an incredibly useful utility, similar to Unity Hub or the Epic Launcher. Sorry that this is the best feedback I could give, but the app really seemed to hate my computer.

The "task defeated" sfx actually made me jump haha. I really like the concept for this idea! I've tried a few game-ified task management apps (I even use one regularly) but this one really takes that to a new level. 

One thing that I think could work really nicely is time stamps. For tasks, that could be the time / date that it was added, so older tasks aren't left behind. The defeated list could also show the time / date that each task was completed. The ability to sort the task list by time could also help keep the list organized in different ways (as well as inverse-sorting, where higher-priority tasks are placed on top).

Overall, this was a very novel concept. The UI was very intuitive, and I don't feel like any necessary functionality was missing for this to be its own fully-functional task management app. Great work!

Thank you for trying it! 

Thank you, I'm glad you liked it!

At least to my understanding, the Markov Chain variant uses randomness (like regular WFC) but it doesn't use weighted decisions. So it asks "what could go here" while Sibyl asks "what would best fit here". 

All that said, WFC and MkWFC are still very good algorithms. Most importantly, they're naturally faster, so they can be used in games for real-time generation, while Sibyl sacrifices some speed for control and quality. I am still working to optimize Sibyl, but it does have a higher workload to contend with.

I am doing something similar, at least on the surface, though it's very different from how WFC is usually implemented. 

WFC's tile-based mode can't analyze textures by itself and needs JSON to know the rules between everything. However, its pixel-based mode can analyze textures but only places pixels in overlapping patterns it recognizes, with no regard for distance or adjacency. Even if you stretch the pixel-based mode to be larger, it'll still have some strange results. 

Sibyl's algorithm was initially inspired by the tile-based approach. But it scans and recognizes tiles in order to automatically create its own rules for each them. In practice, this requires a lot of different changes to how the algorithm even works, to the point where it's become it's own thing. The closest thing I've found to Sibyl's algorithm is something called a Markov Chain-based Wave Function Collapse, but that works very differently on the inside, and it still requires some manual JSON.

The largest difference between MkWFC and Sibyl is that Sibyl also considers probability, based on the template it's provided. So instead of simply placing compatible tiles, it places them according to the frequency in which your template uses them. So if your template has a ton of grass, a moderate amount of water, and a flower that only sometimes appears - Sibyl's outputs will tend to have similar results. This allows it to create levels that feel handcrafted, because it actually studies how the templates you provide are crafted.

Thank you for trying it out!

The program was initially inspired by an algorithm called Wave Function Collapse (https://github.com/mxgmn/WaveFunctionCollapse), which can take a texture and output similar results. The issue with WFC, for me, is that it can only analyze individual pixels on its own, and anything involving tiles requires a time-consuming process of using JSON to manually teach it tile-by-tile relationships.

What Sibyl does is tie both halves together - pixel analysis and tile relationships - so it can automatically read any tilemap and output similar results, all by itself. The first step involves scanning the provided template, recognizing identical tiles, and recording what tiles they're paired with (making them compatible neighbors) in each direction. In the second step, it uses a WFC-like algorithm to place tiles across the level, while attempting to only place compatible neighbors next to each other. 

Moreover, Sibyl also considers how often neighboring combinations are present in the template you provide. This allows it to try to replicate the design of the template itself, rather than simply randomly placing whatever tiles work together. 

As a result, Sibyl can autonomously create levels that also feel handmade, by simply providing it with an example level. However, a carefully-crafted template can provide even more flexible and controlled results, for whoever is willing to spend the time on making one. The Making Templates guide goes through some of the different best practices I've figured out in regards to that. 

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Edit: I tried again and it works now! Not sure why, but at least it does haha.

I use Windows 10. The app itself opened just fine, but the moment I pressed a key, the error appeared.

This is awesome! I'm a composer who likes to work with procedural tools, and this does a great work of creating melodies and harmonies that actually sound decent. Paired with the fact that it comes with three instruments, each with their own oscillators, filters, and settings - and this is actually pretty formidable. 

I appreciate the Upbeat / Melancholy setting, though it would be nice to be able to select a key and scale (including harmonic, dorian, lydian, etc), even if that was hidden behind an "Advanced" option or something. Some additional MIDI generation options, like note density or lines of harmony, would also provide some nice control, though it's not too necessary.

This reminds me of InstaComposer, a similar plugin for DAWs. If this could export MIDI, potentially one synth at a time, or all three at once but in different channels, composers like myself could use it in actual music compositions by dropping the MIDI into our own synths and virtual instruments. 

If you're up for it, I'd even suggest trying to see if you can make a drum machine generator. That would be really fun to play around with. 

Overall, great work! This is definitely a very impressive tool. 

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I redownloaded it a third time, and it works now! I have no idea what happened differently, but apparently it works. This was really fun to play around with. I do composing work from time to time, so I'm familiar with drum machine plugins and found this very easy to use. The old A > E > AS > E sounds as good as ever (though I'm used to it being on the top of bottom keyboard rows, haha). Was this an 808 or a custom collection of drum sounds? The sound is pretty nice.

I received a "mixer not initialized" error on Windows and wasn't able to use the app. I'm not sure what happened. I tried redownloading the app and it happened again. But if it gets fixed, I'd definitely love to retry it. 

As a fully-featured pixel art tool, this is really impressive! I did have some issues, where the magic wand automatically filled a few tiles, and then the undo button wouldn't revert it. But it's still very impressive. For the fill tool, I'd recommend implementing a Flood Fill algorithm so it doesn't overwrite previously-placed tiles. Otherwise it was all very intuitive. Good work!

Hey all. I've recently released Sibyl - The Procedural Level Painter, a program that can intelligently design levels and output tilemaps with little to no manual input required. The Lite version is completely free to use, while the Full version includes a few additional features, such as edge detection, corner detection, tile size, and level size. Feel free to give it a try!

Sibyl is a program that takes prebuilt levels and tilemaps and uses them as templates to make countless other variations. With the press of a button, you can create an entirely new level that not only offers some random variation but also analyzes your template and tries to replicate its rules and personality.

Sibyl can be used for a variety of projects, including top-down RPGs, side scrollers, platformers, and even DnD campaigns. All you need is to provide a base level or a carefully-built template, and Sibyl will do the rest. 





This was absolutely a blast from the past! I haven't touched SunVox in years and had to do a double take when I saw what this app was. The overall aesthetic is really pretty and relaxing, and just about every icon is intuitive in telling what it does at first glance. I even uploaded some of my old projects, and they played perfectly. Well done! This definitely made me smile.

As a music composer, this was actually a lot of fun to play around with. Part of me wishes you could lock the pitches to a particular scale, but that might ruin the charm. It sounds surprisingly nice too, with even higher pitches still feeling very musical. 

This was a pretty interesting tool to try. This is my first experience with a text-based game engine, but the demo games worked pretty nicely and definitely showed how varied and capable this could be.

This one actually fooled me for a bit. I was steaming text when I noticed something was off and realized what was happening. I actually ended up playing around with it for a bit, trying to draw vertical images with text. Of course, I didn't get too far haha.

This is actually pretty awesome! Out of curiosity, I imported an entire folder of images, and it worked perfectly. A few image combinations really made me think it would be cool if this app had a collage mode: where it would fit several images together to cover each page. Since this app is half-meant for manga, a right-to-left reading mode (that starts from the last page) would also fit nicely.

Otherwise, this was a really nice surprise, so I'm glad I checked it out. Great work!

This is really neat! I could actually see this being used in schools - especially the matrices feature. 

I don't have an artistic fiber in my being, but this was actually really fun to use!

This is a really nice app. It's incredibly intuitive, and honestly gave me some inspirational ideas from the first few moments. I've touched a few other "idea generators" before but the level of polish and beautiful color scheme make it feel very impressive. The library of words that pop up, as well as the different categories, create a lot of really fun combinations that actually had me thinking "what if..." more than a few times. Great work!

Be sure to check out the game page to learn how to make the most of Sibyl. Enjoy!

Great to hear! Congrats on the improvements. I should've tried dragging the window, but I'm so used to it being locked that it didn't occur to me haha. 

This game has a very charming presentation! The art, animations, and transitions are really polished. The music and sfx are also very nice and blend very well into the background while still providing some enjoyable sounds. The map is an especially really nice touch that adds a lot of freedom and replayability, while making the school feel like a tangible place. I also really enjoy the writing, which was very natural, and the premise really helped me get into each scene as it happened.

As for feedback, I did find myself a bit confused about who I was or what I was doing, especially in the beginning. I was also very confused when the characters suddenly became human. Additionally, it would be nice to have more options, especially text scroll speed or window size.

I was also left a but surprised when I got a bad end just for missing two points. Needing to max out points to get paired means the player shouldn't waste time getting to know anyone other than the first character they meet, which I think takes away from the VN a bit. Being able to have a partner just by who has the most points - rather than who has maximum points possible - would make for a fairer and more free experience, which the map and choices definitely seem to promote.

Overall though, this was a very nice game that was very put together. The number of scenes and routes means that it has a ton of replayability, which isn't too common for jam VNs. Great work!

So this game was super lovely from the very start. The character art, background art, writing, and the music were all super nice. Even the UI was very pretty (though I did issues with popping open the log by accident and not knowing how to reopen it manually). It's very clear that a lot of time and polish went into this.

As someone with a sweet tooth I... absolutely would've gone into that house haha. I found myself smiling a lot playing this. And also being super impressed by not only the amount of sprites and CG, but also how consistent the character and background art style is. I'm definitely a fan.

Most of all - this story really made me feel something. Like I nearly got emotional. I'm really happy I got the good end, because this was such a sweet story - and I'd love to see it potentially expanded one day. I'm really glad this one caught my eye haha. I have no idea how you made this by yourself, but great work.

This game is adorable, haha. The art, music, controls, and UI all work together to create a very relaxing experience that I enjoyed while playing it. 

I would recommend putting the instructions in-game, somehow, especially since this is a downloaded game. I was very confused until I visited the main page and saw the instructions in the description. 

I love the art, music, and even the controls and UI - this game has a really charming vibe where all its elements just come together really nicely! It feels incredibly polished, and details like monsters destroying the environment when you drag them really blew me away.

I did feel the pets turned into monsters very quickly, and it became immediately overwhelming with so many pets spawning over such a large area. I also struggled to understand what some of their needs were. The purchase bar on top also added another layer of complexity. 

My advice would be to add a tutorial level that's exactly the size of the screen, where the player can get used to playing and meeting needs. That would also help with figuring out different needs icons, since the player would know whatever they need is already on screen, they just need to figure out what it is. Maybe even add pets that transform slower than others, to make things more forgiving. 

I think this is a really engaging experience that even has room for expansion into a larger game, but it's confusing learning curve and overly-large map keep all of its perfect elements from setting into place. If you solved these two (through a small tutorial map or something else), I think this could easily make for a great and very enjoyable experience. Great work!

Thanks for giving it a try! I'm glad you enjoyed the music.

Thanks for playing! Glad you enjoyed it, and found it relaxing. 

This is pretty fun! My team ended up making up a tower defense for the previous jam I was in, so it's nice to see another one in this jam haha. Art and music are both kinda chill in a pretty nice way, which creates this really cool vibe to play with. I thought the game was a bit too easy, since the first five waves only produced one-to-two enemies, until the sixth suddenly sent in 10+ and had me scrambling to make more turrets.

I do like that there are special enemies. My previous team struggled to put in a boss character, so it's nice to see that you have non-normal enemies to mix things up a bit more.  

The procedural maps are also VEEERY cool. Procedural pathfinding can be a huge pain in my experience, so it's pretty cool that you not only have procedural paths that enemies correctly follow, but also procedural tower slots that are never out of range. It also makes me pay attention to the map more, since some towers are definitely in better spots than others and deserve more upgrades. It makes things surprisingly tactical. 

Honestly, if you forced the game to regenerate maps every five waves, I think this game would benefit a lot. I ended up just relaxing on a single map at first, which was okay, but the moment when the game became really fun was when I started pressing R. Because it's left up to players, some might choose to stay on their map or forget regenerating is an option altogether. 

Whereas if, every five maps, you regenerated (and refunded players for towers / upgrades), it would keep the game dynamic and allow it to continue scaling up its difficulty curve. If you limited that refund to a maximum amount or some percentage (50-75%), it would even make players hesitate more about spending money and make the game all the more tactical.

I'd recommend also adding a few more tower types, maybe ones that are a bit more situational. Like an AOE tower for when enemies are grouped together. Or a missile tower for taking down high-health enemies. Or a utility tower that slows speedy enemies. Maybe even a laser tower that never misses. Could add more dynamics to gameplay.

All said, this is a pretty fun experience. Well done!

Wow, this is really impressive! It feels like an old arcade game, especially with the simple gameplay and controls. However, the tilted perspective gives it a really interesting visual touch. 

The enemy designs also add a layer of puzzle solving, where you have to discover the enemy's weakness to safely damage them. Credit to the art for making many of them intuitive to figure out at a glance, like the shield-bearers, who I immediately figured to attack from the back (even if I completely failed in my attempt).

The after-level choice of health or points also adds a nice sense of progression, since player's are rewarded for surviving the challenge, but it also forces them to balance safety with greed - or get good enough to only need points, which is definitely the optimal strategy. 

I like it! I think a lot of good was done here. Great work!

A pong / breakout game is a surprisingly original idea for a roguelike. I kind of like this mixture of classic and modern designs. The visuals are all very minimal and clear, and I like that you used a background color other than black, which makes the visuals feel more relaxed and original.  

One glitch(?) I did encounter is that, if I push the ball straight up, it'll suddenly move diagonally the next turn. Which hurts strategy a bit and can lead to some unexpected movement. 

Overall, this is pretty nice. Using random doors was a pretty clever way to convert this from an arcade game to a roguelike. 

Thank you for the feedback! These are definitely some good points. 

That's great to hear! Our programmer definitely put a lot of effort into it.