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farsidevirtual

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A member registered May 06, 2021 · View creator page →

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This time around, there won't be a theme. I've changed that moving on for future jams.

The jam is about creating a game that has gameplay that lasts around a minute. This isn't like the Zero Hour game jam! 

Generally, in the spirit of jamming, the game should be developed during the jam period, otherwise there's not much point! 

I'm not sure what you mean about limitations - feel free to run any things you're thinking of by me here! 

You can find more details about the rules here: https://itch.io/jam/one-minute-jam

Hope that helps! 

- FSV 

Great question! This time around, there won't be a theme. I've changed that moving on for future jams.

- FSV 

The feedback is super minor - for a jam game, the setup is really good. I definitely think you're onto something with the hybrid exploration / text adventure idea. I don't think I've seen that done anywhere before, at least not in a high profile way. 

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Lots of great stuff going on here for a simple platformer. Adding the additional platforming mechanics, paired with the box cursor idea, means that players are always needing to co-ordinate their movement. It's quite fun and decently challenging in a way that shows a good understanding of how platformers work and what aspects of their level design makes them interesting. 

I thought there were a lot of neat touches to this game. I think the simple graphics allowed you to polish things in a lot of other ways. The kill count and the death ghost effects were some good examples of this. And like any good platformer the new abilities kept coming as the game progressed!

I think the only constructive feedback I'd give is that because the controls require the mouse and keyboard, some of the more complicated movement in the game can get a bit tricky, but I think that's part of the challenge. 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam! 

- FSV 

This is a simple click-based game where the idea is to keep the lights on. I like how the lights are distributed around the room and made more difficult once there's only one or two lights, adding a bit of a challenge to the game. It's simple and intuitive! 

Perhaps for a challenge, there could be a timer to see how long the lights can be kept on. Or increasingly quick or random light changes as the game goes on. The possibilities are endless! I think the next step would be to interact with the environment as a fully 3D space as well. 

Oh! Also I thought the surprise for the lose state was very funny! 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam! 

- FSV 

This is a neat little game that is a mix of room escape and adventure game. Generally, the player navigates the room and tries not to run afoul of the many things that will most definitely kill them! 

I thought the strange mix of items in the room design actually added a sense of humour to the game. The creepy clock that started ticking and them throwing down some dance music beats was fun.

Gameplay wise, the game is less about adventure and more exploring and figuring out which item combinations will and won't kill you to create a happy to a deadly ending. Some of these were funny! 

For feedback, I'd say be careful about collision and make sure that the player can access items from a reasonable distance without clipping into objects. But this is a super minor thing, all in all. 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam! 

- FSV 

This is a nice little maze game that has three aspects that make it tricky: limited line of sight, and limited light that requires the player to use a torch to see anything. Oh, and there's lots of ghosts! The simple monochrome style works for the game, given it's all about low light and spookiness. 

For a first game (at least on itch.io) this is well put together and clearly shows an understanding of how to combine mechanics to create something a little unique and workable. The game has quite a few levels with enough twists and turns to keep things interesting (and so very, very spooky)! 

I think one bit of feedback I'd give is that I'd remap the 'zoom out' function to the RMB or something the left hand can reach. Going back and forth between movement, the flashlight, and seeing the map requires the player to move their hands around a lot! Unless that's part of the challenge! 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam! 

- FSV 

This is a really neat idea for a maze puzzle. Rather than the game having visually apparent obstacles, the barriers to the game are completely invisible and cause the player to restart when activated. So the player has to reverse-engineer the ideal path to take from figuring out where they restarted.

The co-ordinate and minimap system is reasonably useful for achieving this purpose, being vague enough to make the player rely on memory of their pathing and last co-ordinate. This makes it actually pretty damn challenging! Maybe because I have the memory of a goldfish at the best of times. 

I think trial-and-error gameplay can be very hard to nail. Enough times through the floor, and it's easy to feel frustrated for some players. But other players thrive on this sort of thing too. One idea could be to have different gradiations of challenge, from a very clear pathing of the player's last route represented onscreen, to players having to map out their co-ordinates entirely. That'd be brutal! 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam! 

- FSV 

This is a nice and simple environment design around the 'winning son?' meme that does the rounds every now and then. What you see is what you get here! There's a good platform here to further develop a good environment for an adventure game using a side-scrolling 2D axis. 

Great work with delving into the world of sprite animation! It's not easy to think about how to animate character movement and execute it. One pointer - always make sure you've removed the background to the alpha layer, otherwise it can pick up some flecks of white on the frames. 

Here's a neat idea - when fully fleshing out environments like this, consider how you can use layering to have the character move in front of objects in the background but behind objects in the foreground. This can give the game environment an illusion of greater depth! It's a neat trick. 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam!

- FSV 

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This is a nice and succinct exercise in interactive fiction that uses the theme of darkness quite well. The game substitutes the sense of sight for describing things in terms of its direction, and its tactile qualities, to describe the state of blindness.

This is very short - as acknowledged on the submission page. I think it's brief, abstract approach isn't necessarily a bad thing. Short form poetry exists, after all; why can't interactive fiction also give brief experiences and glimpses of places, thoughts, sensations? 

It's nice, simple and brief. I hope you continue developing interactive fiction! 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam! 

- FSV 

Yes, that's something that I'm working on and will be going through the games with feedback. 

I hope to get it sorted out during the first weekend after the jam, which starts tomorrow. 

Thanks for your patience!

- FSV 

Sorry about that! Try this link - 

https://discord.gg/jsyu9XgpuU

- FSV 

This is pretty damn neat and an original idea! 

The meta approach to the game is a lot of fun. The ability to be able to wander away from the computer presents a lot of potential for designing a hybrid adventure game. Having a mock DOS architecture with its own little secrets too was quite a surprise!

It's very interesting how you approach this game as well, considering the potential for the game to serve many functions: a text adventure, a sort of meta adventure game, but also a platform for some more meaningful storytelling for the player to discover too. 

In terms of the text adventure part in itself, good parsing for accessibility is always a tricky thing with a text adventure. If you have the time, always think about alternative phrases (LOOK [ITEM]) as opposed to (LOOK at [ITEM]). But that's a polish thing.  

I'd say in order to keep the narrative of the game as coherent as it can be,  greater effort should be put in attempting to reconcile the physical environment around the player with the contextual information on the computer. Is the player the owner of the computer who composed the notes? It may help with the worldbuilding to place the character more firmly in their shoes, and make their environment more identifiable. 

There is great potential in what you've done and I'd be very keen to see how you develop the ideas as they stand. Plus, I really want to play Gremlins Quest 3! 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam!

- FSV 

This is a delightfully creepy top-down shooter. It's clear you had a good think about how the mechanics of this sort of game work and implemented it pretty well.  The scribble approach to animation, paired with the monochrome, makes it a little creepy too. 

The enemy types are diverse enough to keep the game interesting! Each has a unique design that adds to the challenge - from enemies that move quickly, require a lot of damage to down, or have unpredictable and erratic pathing, making them hard to hit. 

One aspect that really added to the challenge was the inclusion of friendly fire. This makes it really difficult as the player must loop back around instead of shooting at enemies from the other side of the room. I ran afoul of this design feature a couple of times!

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam!  

- FSV 

Sure! My resolution is 2560x1440. I'm on Chrome, if that helps. 


This is a bizarre sort of  survival (?) game where the player has to maintain a time-limited production line and keep the entire supply chain running smoothly ... or else! 

I thought that the logistics of the game were fairly well thought out. The production line is intuitive once you figure out what all the levers are for, and I found it was a good balance of difficulty trying to get the plants grown in time, whilst keeping the power going. 

Whilst I didn't play through to see if there was any progression or an ending, maybe exploring different sources of challenge could diversify the game a little, such as adding different types of plants or orders instead of just increasing the order size and time limit. 

Oh, and the secret behind this basement is a fun touch! I didn't notice it until far, far too late, and too many of my plants had been fertilised! 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam! 


- FSV 

Physics coding is really tricky. It's very difficult to make something behave in a way that feels natural. 

And hey - first completed game is still an achievement in itself! It takes a lot to get something to the point where you're comfortable to bring it out in the world and show it off. 

- FSV 

This is a innovative idea with a bunch of potential that requires the player to participate in a room escape game using audio feedback. The idea is great - the stereo channels help orient the player around the room, which helps them locate objects and find a way out. 

The game display doesn't seem to be optimised for my resolution and cuts off part of the screen, so at first I didn't realise that there is also text feedback in the game to assist the player! I sort of just fumbled around until I found the key and the first door exit. 

This mechanic has plenty to offer. I think the most interesting aspect of the game is finding novel and non-visual ways to assist player navigation.  Here's an idea, if probably unworkable - instead of telling the player what objects are, why not use sound effects? 

This game fits nicely into the concept of the jam and adds a fun twist on the room escape genre. I really encourage you to keep finding new ways to approach conventional genres! 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam! 

- FSV 

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This is neat! It's a simple physics-based game based around manipulating a cube on a number of axes to get Object A to the static Object B. I remember when little toys like this used to be all over novelty and toy stores, and were a lot of fun to play around with. 

For a first game, this is a great effort. The logistics of making sure the physics isn't a mess and the manipulation of the cube and the objects in different ways is technically quite a difficult thing for a beginner. Puzzle games are one of those 'pick up and play' sort of things that are always good to start with in development. This is a lot more complex than a simple puzzle game though! It's clear that you've put a lot of work into the process of making this. 

Some points for constructive feedback: 

  • The physics is definitely something that can be refined a little. Because the objects have a preference to stick closely to the ground, they like to clip through barriers when quickly rotated, taking the path of least resistance. Whilst this made the game a little easier, I'm guessing that wasn't exactly how it was intended!  But the game still performs pretty well nonetheless.
  • Adding better definition and lighting to the barriers, such as more sharply defined edges, might help distinguish where the player can and cannot manipulate the objects too. 
  • Having a system, even just a button, to progress players to the next level, would be nice too. 

Thanks for submitting this game to the 'A Dark Room' jam! 

- FSV 

Not really!

In the spirit of the jam, polishing one game is preferable to making a lot of them. But if you have a few ideas, that's alright too. 

So long as you're not spamming the jam with low-quality entries, it's all good!

- FSV 

Hey! 

In the spirit of the jam, folks are encouraged to create new games for the jam so that the theme can help them explore new ideas with game development. 

It's okay if you'd like to, but as the jam isn't really ranked or anything like that, there isn't much to get out of the process.

Hope that helps answer your question! 

- FSV 

The theme itself is not strongly policed and all interpretations are welcome. In the spirit of the jam, I only ask that some attempt be made to confine gameplay in a single interior space with as few transitions between different spaces as possible. The point of the jam is to encourage developers to try and face restrictions that challenge them, so if it's done that already, it's all good! 

I hope this helps!

- FSV 

Hey, thanks for the questions! 

1) Late submissions are fine! Just make sure you either (a) submit the game page to the jam before the deadline and change accordingly, or (b) keep in touch with me and send over your game page link so I can send you a late submission link.

2) No problem with long/experimental games - you're more than welcome to submit. I might not be able to finish, but I'll give it a good go. 

Hope this answers your question! 

- FSV 

You're more than welcome to use assets from asset packs you own. I understand not everyone can create assets from scratch, and that's okay! 

- FSV 

Great point!

This jam is laid-back and unranked, which is why there isn't a feature to encourage people to start work around the jam's start date. 

That said, in the spirit of the jam, it's something that I definitely encourage people to do - otherwise you could just make a game, well, whenever! 

But there's certainly nothing stopping you from setting up your game if you need to prepare. I hope that helps answer your question! 

- FSV 

Thanks a bunch for keeping on with this game and doing a post-jam release! 

This works really well as a sort of endurance runner game. I'm not very good at it; I didn't last very long, but I liked the diversity of obstacle patterns and the part of the UI that helps you figure out how far you have to go up the tower. 

Visually this is fun. You use a very nice warping effect to simulate the idea of a curved staircase. The hair texture makes the game quite psychedelic. I thought the use of lice as an obstacle was a playful and inventive take on the source image, great humour.

As far as constructive feedback? Hmm. These sort of games aren't for me as I am rubbish at co-ordination, I don't think it should be easier though. Maybe more in the way of an increasing difficulty curve to ramp up the challenge as you ascend the tower.

Thanks again for submitting this to the jam! 

- FSV

Hey! 

Thanks for your questions. I've posted the answers below: 

1) I've just created a Discord server! You can find it here: https://discord.gg/4aZbMFC3Wt

2) I've had a lot of experience managing jams under other accounts in the past. Ranked jams are great for large jams, and I might look at doing them in the future. However, from what I've seen, ranking in smaller jams creates an issue, as people who come last are more sensitive to it. When you're trying to encourage people, sometimes ranking can work, and sometimes it can put off people when their game doesn't go as well as they hoped. It's a difficult balance. 

3) Yep, any game engine is fine! Asset packs are welcomed. Basically, so long as you're not lifting someone else's stuff without permission, it's alright. 

4) Not for this jam! Unfortunately I work full-time so managing these jams and playing all the games is enough work in itself. I have created games in the past under the moniker 'SCREAM CATALOGUE' though. 

- FSV 

There's now a Discord you can join if that's your thing: https://discord.gg/4aZbMFC3Wt

- FSV 

No problem! 

There's now a Discord you can join if that's your thing: https://discord.gg/4aZbMFC3Wt

- FSV

Hey, this is a great question. 

The jam theme and its confines are open-ended and I encourage you to interpret it as you like. There isn't any judging against the criteria. 

I like the idea! Feel free to push the prompt as far (or as little) as needed. Look forward to trying out your game! 

- FSV 

Nice, it's a bit of a surrealistic walking sim, with some absurdist elements that remind me of Osamu Sato's work. I did a playthrough video below: 

I love how the game wordlessly is able to tell its own little horror story through the use of animation. 

I think the character movement could have been a little faster; ambling through the complex took its fair time! 

Great work!

I since found it - thanks for the hint though! Lovely way to tie the context of the story together through a different perspective.

Great work! :) 

Hey, thanks for submitting this to the jam! 

First, it's really obvious that you had a blast getting the models and implementing them into the mall environment. It looks like a really fun place for a horror FPS and I like how you created a progression system in the mall by unlocking stores/levels. 

For constructive feedback, the weapons system is definitely good at being 'realistic' but currently plays a little slow. I spent more of my time running away and reloading than actually shooting, which is good for survival horror, but not for a shootout! 

Look forward to seeing where this WIP goes. Really encourage you to keep developing and flesh out this idea. We definitely need more Dead Rising inspired games, because I love them a bunch, and it's a lot of fun.  

- FSV 

Congrats on finishing a first game! I'm glad you enjoyed making it and learned a lot along the way. It's always super important to enjoy the process. Unity is such a good platform to put together 3D games and it's super accessible as well. 

I thought the idea of a cursed email was a really good one. The Elmo ending up on the wall behind me was a mix of funny and a little creepy, but it made me laugh. Long dimly-lit hallways are also really good for horror games. 

One thing to take away from this game is learning how to guide the player through good level design. The levels are a bit big and mazelike. When you're designing things, think about how you can make players go a certain way, and what might make them lost.

Thanks for submitting this to the jam! 

Look forward to seeing what you do with the idea! :) 

- FSV 

Hey, I look forward to playing this! No rush, let me know when it's all done. 

- FSV 

Hey, I look forward to playing this! No rush, let me know when it's all done. 

- FSV 

This is a fun idea that harnesses Bitsy to use storytelling. I've always liked how accessible Bitsy was as a platform, especially to improve access to game development.

I like the approach. It's really passive, like a report. It's strongly inspired by the SCP mythos and the idea that innocuous objects, like a chair, can be in fact very cursed. 

Not much to say about this brief experience from a position of feedback, but it does what it does very well. Maybe including some secrets in the game could be an option? 

Thanks for submitting this to the jam! 

- FSV 

Hey, thanks for submitting this game to the jam! 

It's great that you've used your own art in the GameMaker engine for character portraits and environments. This is really great, and totally encourage you to continue working on asset creation for games in the future. 

As far as constructive feedback, not too much to sort out other than polishing some collision on some objects, and maybe having the player character Edric narrate to or interact with more things to  add more storytelling to the game. 

Currently I'm a bit stuck. Where do I go after confronting Edric's parents in the hallway about what I found in the locked box the previous night?  

- FSV 

This is hilarious! Great work with the deer model - I love how it sort of doesn't stop staring at you. I did a playthrough video and posted a review on the jam submission page: 

This game has a lot of potential! It's a simple and effective game where the player is motivated to race against time and use a few tricks up their sleeve to stop the deer turning off all of the lights. Makes sense to me! 

The deer itself is the highlight. Great use of the cursed image, and the model is absolutely fantastic. The fact that the deer's face follows you around is eerie and absolutely adds to the uncanny vibe. 

A few tweaks could assist with the gameplay. I didn't really last long enough to see more deer; or does the deer slowly go faster in pace? The lava is a bit iffy and it's far too easy to fall into - maybe spawning it further from the player may help. 

I did a playthrough below: 

For a second game, this is good fun! I encourage you to keep working on these and focus on how the mechanics come together to make the game fun and keep people hooked.

Thanks for submitting to the jam! 

- FSV