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clericbob

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A member registered Feb 01, 2019 · View creator page →

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pro tip: this game is much easier to play if you use a controller and rebind the grapple button to one (or both) of the shoulder buttons.  pico-8 standalone doesn't support rebinds, so I had to use antimicro - other keybinding programs should also work fine.

chmod +x is necessary any time Linux programs are distributed in .zip files.  Zip doesn't save any of the system flags that Linux uses to determine if something's a usable program, so the system assumes it's not unless it tell you.

This could be fixed if the program were re-compressed into a .tar.gz archive instead of a zip archive, but it'd have to be done on a Linux [or Mac I guess?] computer because Windows doesn't track those tags either (so they would still not exist).  It's not really a big deal, but it might be good if DU&I mentioned it in the readme.

Sorry for long response you didn't really ask for, I just thought this might be useful information for someone.

I resolved this by updating my mono installation.  If you're running the same version of mono as I was, try downloading a newer version from the official site (mono-project.com) and using the original file names

Hello folks,

I've made several attempts at starting game development projects but I always seem to run into the same problem.  In early stages of development, when I should be focusing on the core mechanics and featuees, I keep bogging myself down with details.  Eventually, I burn myself out on whatever project I've started, either because I can't get a particular thing to work out as intended or because after spending hours on these details, I still haven't built a playable demo.

In the early stages of development, what techniques do you use to maintain focus on the most important core concepts that need to be implemented?

Hello,

I was excited when I saw this project, as I have been using Famitracker for a few months but vastly prefer the interface of a DAW.  However, when I attempted to open the program on my Linux computer (after installing gtk-sharp2 as described in the README file) the program would not open.  Here's the error:


Unhandled Exception:
System.DllNotFoundException: NesSndEmu.so
  at (wrapper managed-to-native) FamiStudio.NesApu:Init (int,int,int,int,FamiStudio.NesApu/DmcReadDelegate)
  at FamiStudio.NesApu.InitAndReset (System.Int32 apuIdx, System.Int32 sampleRate, System.Boolean pal, System.Int32 expansion, System.Int32 numExpansionChannels, FamiStudio.NesApu+DmcReadDelegate dmcCallback) [0x00000] in <a0333e985f1745a5ae076f531f0a05e7>:0

[several more lines of traceback]


The NesSndEmu.so file is there, located in the same directory as the executable, but mono doesn't seem to pick it up.  

When I run "mono -V", this is the version string I get:

Mono JIT compiler version 4.6.2 (Debian 4.6.2.7+dfsg-1ubuntu1)

Is there any other configuration stuff I might need to worry about to get this working?

I also attempted to run the Windows version using WINE, but while the program would open, there seemed to be an issue with path resolution as it would not open any of my existing .nsf files.

Please let me know if you have any advice.  Thanks!

Hello all,

I was wondering why some developers choose not to release their games on every platform that their engine supports.  I see a lot of Unity games on here that are exported exclusively for Windows, or occasionally for Windows and macOS, but often developers seem to forget to export to Linux.  I run Linux usually, and while Wine and Mono can run Unity games compiled for Windows, they are often buggier and slower than games that are compiled as native Linux binaries.  The same can be said for most cross-platform game engines.  Additionally, Wine installs are large and pervasive, and nearly impossible to remove fully - some Linux users choose to avoid Wine for those reasons.

I understand that exporting games takes time, but wouldn't it be relatively simple to run the export overnight when you aren't using your computer in order to support more players?  Is there some other reason that I'm not thinking of that devs would prefer to support fewer platforms?

Would love to hear some thoughts from the community.

This is literally not even about the bundle.  The mentioned bundle is great, but I have items in my library that I cannot find that have nothing to do with the bundle.  Anything I owned before two weeks ago is at the very bottom of my library, which is difficult to get to because the library is only in infinite scrolling mode (I can't just click page 30 or whatever to get to the end).

I appreciate your trying to help, but Itch has a lot of good games and content that weren't included in the bundle and navigating that is what I'm more concerned about.  Honestly, the bundle page has text search, so navigating that is even easier than navigating my library is.

I agree that the library really needs to be improved.  I have games (from this bundle and from previous ones) that I have a hard time finding because there's basically no tools for navigating through the things I own.  I hoped that the desktop app would be better in that regard, but it has just as few filters for my library as the webpage does.  I'd appreciate it even if I could dump my library to a spreadsheet (or csv) file and look through it there.

Alternatively, the normal store/browse page could just add a filter for owned items and call it a day, since all of the search/sort features I'd request are already implemented there.