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rriegs

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A member registered May 03, 2018

Recent community posts

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Great atmosphere and story, and I think I get the respawn mechanic: workers are being forced back into the complex to shut the thing down with no consideration for their own survival.

I found some issues with the double-jump controls.  In particular, my keyboard (just a regular US laptop) apparently can't send space, left, and up at the same time, though all other combinations seem to work.  Thankfully, one doesn't have to keep space down after initiating a double jump, so with some practice I managed to figure it out.  (The tutorial helped, but I still didn't realize I could use up or down or indeed changing sequences of directions for a while.)  Beyond that, game lag (picks up once a few areas have been cleared) sometimes affects how long you can fly, making certain tricky jumps  a bit trickier.  But then I suppose powered exoskeletons might fail in high radiation environments, so we'll call that a feature :)

Edit: Adding WASD as alternate keys for movement and Shift for jump would help with my keyboard woes and appease folks who prefer directional controls to be on the left.

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I'm eager to give this game a try, but the game window doesn't appear to be sensitive to my mouse wheel (I'm using Firefox).  Would it be possible to add other keys to change the hot bar selection, e.g. Tab / Shift-Tab to cycle and/or numbers to jump to a specific slot?

Edit: I managed to get the mouse wheel to work somehow, but I think redundant keyboard controls would still be a good idea.

The game's off to a good start, but I feel like flying on the broom could be improved: (1) flight speed seems a bit slow; (2) I observe you can't strafe (use A or D) while flying; and (3) why not just fly up and down according to whether the camera is aimed up or down (i.e. the same as is done for turning left and right)?

There are other control enhancements that might make sense, too.  I often find myself trying to use E to close the dresser/loot screens, but this in fact reveals a bug!  Pressing E again while looting re-rolls the loot, such that you can get as much of whatever you want from just one kill.  Another important bug is that you can exchange anything in your inventory with slots in the loot screen—including your wand—which is immediately lost upon closing it.

"Let's put one of those beefy arms back on him for good measure"!  Terrific concept and very satisfying game play!

If you're interested, here are some ideas for further development:

  • Movement on the ground is a bit awkward.  The dragon clearly lands (and aims differently), but moving left and right periodically causes you to take off again (adjusting aim downwards).  It would be nice if you more consistently walked around, preserving useful aim.
  • Ground-based threat is very minimal.  It would be nice to see, e.g., some knights riding around down there with lances that can stab you for instant death, etc.
  • Castles are basically the same as other structures, but take longer to destroy.  They're drawn with ramparts---why not dot them with archers that can't be killed until the structure crumbles?
  • There's essentially no reason not to just hold Z/C down constantly.  Breathing fire could come with a trade-off: perhaps it could slow you down considerably, or could exhaust rechargeable energy (or even life for a real challenge!).
  • You have a whole unused X/V button that could add some interesting game mechanic.  My recommendations would be (a) a different attack, e.g. claws, that is better vs certain targets such as castles, (b) moving without adjusting aim, such that one can fly backwards while holding X/V, or (c) adjusting aim without moving (perhaps even allowing you to breath fire straight up or straight down, etc.).

Anyway, thanks for a great game!

Revisiting this game, I still can't figure out the computer.  There are plenty of plausible messages that can be copied and subtly modified from the poster on the far right, some exactly 24 characters long, but nothing that I've tried has worked.  As far as I can gather, the input is meant to be general commentary on the setting of the game: a ruined planet Earth devoid of life.  Alas, the English language is too flexible to guess the right wording!

Or perhaps the real twist is that you didn't code an ending, leaving us instead to ponder the last lamentations of a wizened digital elephant.

This game is very interesting and I think has potential to be very strategic.  So far, I'm finding it necessary for my heroes to always advance all of the stats, the main challenge being deciding what order and getting a feel for how much is enough for a given level.  If one hero gets stuck after losing too many challenges, the other gives you another chance to go rescue it, but otherwise I mainly stick to one hero if I manage to level it enough to complete the map.

Some ideas for further hero–hero interaction are as follows:

  • When one hero beats a specific challenge type, it suppresses the difficulty of that challenge type by one level for one turn for the other hero.  This lets a hero powerful in stat X help a hero weak in X if X is that hero's next step.  Determining which hero to advance becomes a significant factor in bringing the heroes together.
  • Given the above, it might make sense to have more than two heroes on a map, possibly with some totally isolated from the others (existing only for the purpose of helping other heroes beat specific challenges).

I remember this having been playable online.  Kinda miss it being that way, but from what I recall it was a fun, well-made little game.

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Wow, this is quite a compelling story, and well delivered in an immersive, interactive medium.  And is that Bitsy inside Twine?  I had no idea one could do that.  Well played!

I believe you can just enter the launch code from that screen.

I've noticed an mildly exploitable bug: the heroes available to be recruited are not kept as part of the save-state.  Accordingly, if you don't like the batch of heroes presented to you, you can just save and reload to get new ones.

Just wanted to follow up to say thanks for all the quality-of-life improvements, including addressing the ideas I mentioned above.

The interface is starting to feel really nice, like I was a militia's quartermaster or the mayor of some besieged village.  I'd say the only thing missing is a bit of flavor text expressing a greater sense of objective and urgency—what really are we trying to accomplish in the woods, mountains, swamps, and ruins?  Is there some specific lost artifact?  Some Big Bad we aim to slay?  Even if the goal is just to build an empire of scrap, seeing it put to opulent use might be fun, a la the various Dwarf Fortress megastructures: palaces, giant statues, even gateways to the Underworld if you're into that sort of thing.

Very excited to hear about your renewed effort to work on the PC version of this game!  I wanted to mention that the link to your Patreon account above doesn't take me anywhere useful, just to a list of things you've supported.  Are you accepting donations there?  I'd also be curious what your funding needs/goals are to continue development on Slipways, in particular if you plan to hire more developers.

Thanks again for a great game!  I'd love to see it reach it's fullest potential.

Wow, fun concept.  Dying on the last level and then respawning with just 1 heart and no medkits on the floor makes for quite the challenge, but doable nonetheless.

Regarding the bug, upon completing what I could of the map, three tiles remained that would highlight if I moused over them, but could not be selected and didn't have any graphics indicating a challenge to face there.  At first I presumed these being empty was just the result of randomization, i.e. that some lands could generate with no challenge and that was fine, but upon subsequent play-throughs, I've noticed it was the same lands that were again highlightable but not selectable (though most everything else had randomized).  Perhaps there is some problem generating content for certain tiles?  If it helps, these are the village three tiles northeast of the starting castle, the shire to its immediate west, and the mountain on the northern edge of the northeast corner of the map.

Experimental though it may be, this game has a nice concept and is surprisingly polished.  I may just be missing something, but there seems to be no win condition: eventually, there were no more regions I could select, and as a result, the game stopped progressing.  Also, while I understand the mechanic of not being able to idle, I found myself at times with no heroes available and still being forced to engage in doomed quests.  Perhaps idling should be allowed (i.e. ending one's turn without selecting a region), though with quests on the map having a maximum total number of turns they can sit unaddressed before failure.  Lastly, I think it would be neat if one could add adventurers to quests that have already started.

MILD SPOILER ALERT.  There, you've been warned.


Finally got around to playing this, and wow.  The dark humor may be a bit over the top, but for me what really did it was the catastrophic collapse of the fourth wall, and then the wall behind that: the highest moment was easily, "This little endeavor isn't for you.  It's for me"—interestingly on only one path through the true ending, and fortunately the one I chose first.

I'd say this game's deep commentary on our inability to change has given me a lot to think about—enlightened me, even made me a better person—but then, reflecting on its message, I suppose I know better.  We are all Merkle: if you come away from this game thinking you've learned something, you haven't, and yet if you think you haven't, you have.  This game is a koan.

I love the concept of this game, plus the shadow puppet sequences give it a nice storytelling ambiance.

I would like to comment, however, that game progression and the cost/value balance for upgrades seem a bit off.  A simple winning strategy is to build about equal parts houses and windmills, plus enough extra houses to cover lost vikings (that won't already be recovered by empty houses), with the occasional bazaar thrown in.  It doesn't take long to accumulate 100 coins for an easy win.  Most upgrades, e.g., to longhouses, are much too expensive (and actually *worse,* given that they don't refill as reliably).  By the time it makes sense to start buying them, say because the map is full, you already have enough coins to win the game.

As simple as it is, this game is really quite silly fun.  I'd love to see more of the "wait, there's more?" aspect, as occurs when the shop and dwarf show up, as in, it would be fun if all of those useless items actually turned out to be useful somehow!  It's a bit slow to start, so I suspect a lot of players quit before noticing there are more mechanics than clicking a button to reveal a sentence; the sentences changing are at least a clue.

Nice use of straight HTML5 (complete with responsive layout!) to implement this one, by the way.  Tons of games like this are done in Unity or whatnot for reasons unknown and have a habit of turning my laptop into a noisy fingertip warmer.

This game is silly and fun.  I keep wondering, are they ever going to learn to put on some clothes? =)

I wish the auto sell/replace features ran about 3x faster, and also that they'd affect the second tab as well (or at least not sell people that could help there).

FYI if you're using Firefox, go to about:config and edit browser.backspace_action to 2.  This means, "really, backspace is *just for text* thx bye."

I have so lost, like, actual work I get paid for to that one.  It's the first setting I change.

I've really enjoyed this game.  The depth of play is just terrific.  It's a bit slow to start, but once you've figured a few things out you realize how much opportunity there is for strategy and customization.

I realize and appreciate that this is a work in progress.  I think it would be neat to see a bit more information available about combat in progress, perhaps after purchasing an upgrade in town.  You can sit and watch to learn what abilities are common in the different areas, but a log of some sort or stats on the current monster would help inform how to outfit your heroes.  Also, it took me a while to realize that the hero stats you can see only pertain to the hero you're *about* to send out, not any of the heroes currently questing.  Perhaps the stats panel specifically on the Battle tab should pertain to the hero in combat for the selected area (like how the right-hand panel does).

This was lots of fun, and very true to the theme: Hades, the original underworld!

There are lots of ways to "solve" each room, but that doesn't detract from the puzzle-rpg cross-over feel.  Along those lines, perhaps there could be an extended-play mode with randomly generated rooms; I suspect you can find the right balance between "can just make a bee-line to the stairs" and "no way to walk into the room without taking damage".

My only complaint was that it was a bit unintuitive how to "aim" things like charge and boulders.  I didn't realize at first that charge actually needs an open space between Heracles and the first monster, nor was it immediately clear that boulders were targeted by clicking one of the four tiles cardinally adjacent to Heracles.  (I at first tried to click the monster I intended to hit instead.)  A visual cue like always highlighting tiles a selected action can affect could help with this.  Also, I found myself clicking an already selected action in attempt to deselect it; that might make sense as an alternative to right-clicking.

I too found the sfx quite pleasant after a few upgrades.  Thought this was a clicker, but turns out it's a synth rhythm game!

This game's concept is a lot of fun.  I could totally see it as a single-player or multi-player-cooperative board game, too!

This is a terrific game!

The encroaching darkness as well as the gradual maxing out your tile upgrades adhere strongly to the theme, but what I really love about this game is the gradual reveal of its depth and the different strategies you might be able to use to win.  Just when you think you've figured out, "OK, so I can also build cities for a research victory," you discover, "whoa, there's a potion factory?"

I got stuck there, too (the crystal in the little square box with one opening), though I think I had gravity pointing to the right, such that I could fall through the opening, but not jump back out.

But man is this game neat.  Nice job figuring out all kinds of things to do with a game element most just think of as a necessary evil: the edge of the screen.

This is just awesome.

I'd love to see a "mate in k" puzzle mode, where the sequence of available cards is fixed and the player must win in k turns.

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I'm enjoying this game so far and look forward to further development.

The difficulty level is about right for casual play and I like the reveal-to-inventory-to-deck mechanic.  There are some balance issues with cards, though nothing game-breaking: both Anticipate++ and Apple++ pale in comparison to simple (and common) Green Tea, etc.

One thing that's really throwing me though is that cards are drawn with replacement, meaning that my hand sometimes fills up with cards that are difficult to play—in particular things like Slam in the Barbarian deck, which can easily get you killed.  If cards were instead drawn without replacement, I could at least rest assured that, e.g., both of my Slam cards are already in my hand and I won't see any more.

Edit: Corrected card name from Bash to Slam; guess I'd confused it with another game.  Same idea, though.

I greatly enjoyed this game.

The worlds-within-worlds mechanic is masterfully applied to every aspect of game play: Your inventory is your world; Creatures attack you by entering your world; You can recover stolen food by entering their world after they get bored of yours and leave; You can even kill creatures by stealing all of their food.  The opening quote aptly sets the theme.

The command interface (key + direction) gives the game a traditional rogue-like feel, though thankfully without as much of a learning curve.  I miss the ability to idle, though it's usually possible to 'b'ash or 'e'ject something to similar effect.  The absence of (direct) inventory management is also a bit of a challenge, though curiously fitting given the inability to enter your own world.

Beyond that, the game has a surprising attention to detail: Different terrains pertaining to each type of creature; Creatures with different food preferences; Rams bash!; Elephants trample!; Spiders cast webs!; Slime molds eat everything!

This game is pretty neat; I'd love to see some further development.

I was thrown at first because (at least the first time I launched the game in browser), my starting characters couldn't interact with anything (gems, mates, even spikes, etc.), and so they'd all just die of old age.  After a relaunching the issue seemed to be resolved.

While it's a style choice, I think it would be kind of nice to implement HP rather than sudden death upon encountering something dangerous.  You already even have the necessary mechanic: just dock a few years from the critter's remaining lifespan.  That way the player can learn to stay out of water, etc., without as much an interruption to play.

Also, pressing 'x' once for suicide is pretty easy to hit on accident.  It would be nice if there was a confirmation.

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I've observed two other bugs:

One, in the souvenir selection screen, if you click a souvenir (bringing up the confirmation button) but then click Restart, the active souvenirs are cleared as normal but the confirmation button remains and works.  As such, once you have access to 3 souvenirs, it is possible to repeat the above process to activate souvenirs as far right as you want, skipping the ones on the left.

Second, somehow defeating one cerberus head and letting it respawn removed the stairs, which were in the same row.  Also, while I'm not sure if it's related or indeed a bug, using a mirror card on cerberus heads reflected damage to other monsters.  Edit: Refreshing did not bring the stairs back, so I had to abandon the game.

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This game is just lovely!

I managed to trigger a hang (in the Flash version at least) by dying to a trap after playing a card that permits me to take another action (in this case, a sword with another sword in my hand).  It looks like it's waiting for me to play the other sword or end my turn, but I'm dead so I can't.

Edit: Given that the game is (often) deterministic, especially considering how much damage you will take after a given action (e.g. because monsters will get a turn or a bomb/trap will hit you), it might be nice to indicate somehow that taking a certain action will result in your death.  For instance, when targeting the effect of a card, it could highlight the target in red or show some tooltip text warning you that such an action would be your last.

To me, this is like the concept of check in chess.  There, players aren't even allowed to take an action that would result in immediate game loss, though in this game, actions resulting in death can still make sense if, e.g., you get a souvenir or a few stars to count towards a gift.

Granted, it may be very tricky to even determine if an action will result in death in certain circumstances.  For instance, defeating enough monsters to reach the next power-up might let you increase (and refill) your will, but could also easily give you power-up options that aren't able to save you from the immediately following attacks.

Very much enjoying the game, but I seem to have triggered a bug: I lost the ability to interact with people after the gypsum quest, though I could still interact with buildings.  It made it impossible to progress.

Also, the robot graphic would frequently become misaligned with its actual location, sometimes by more than entire cell.  This seemed to have something to do with drill upgrades and mining long channels.

The connection goes in the other direction.  Take a close look at the computer's keyboard, and you'll notice the symbols are more familiar than they might at first seem.  Then try to read the symbols on the engine.

I suspect the message on the pole to the far right of the map has something to do with solving the computer, but it's not actually possible to enter it in verbatim (it's both too long and contains a symbol not on the keyboard).

Click on the monster icon in the wilderness.  This will cause a dagger command to appear above the shaman and selection boxes to appear around each tribesman.  Click on several tribesmen to form a hunting party, and then click on the dagger to send them to fight.

This game is astonishingly awesome!  Once one figures out a few preliminaries, gameplay is intuitive and yet difficult to master.

Some development observations, if you're still interested:

  • I second (third?) the requests to be able to destroy and/or move objects created by the player.  In particular, I find it frustrating when I do my best to position a slipgate or other space station only to find out an intended slipway to it just nicks a planet or barely fails to reach.  Building a slipway simultaneously when placing a space station (e.g. by clicking the space station button and then clicking and dragging from a planet) would resolve some of this.
  • I've also run into the problem (faced by others here) where large networks of slipgates fail to work as expected.  As noted, resources are distributed over networks according to the sequence of slipway creation, and as a result, the first planets and stations connected to the network tend to be oversupplied while everything else is starved.  This might be fixed if planets stopped accepting new resources once they've reached "rich", though I suspect resource allocation may need to be more subtle than that.  It might also help to prioritize more recently added slipways, but keep existing resource allocations in place.  An alternative is to limit the viability of slipgate network creation, e.g. by limiting the maximum network size to 2 or 3 slipgates, etc.
  • Another related issue I've spotted is that sometimes when connecting two planets such that the first needs X to produce more Y and the second needs Y to produce more X, neither sees an increase in production.  This only occurs when the planets are already connected to other slipways consuming their existing production.  Having connected the planets to each other first avoids the paradox.  Otherwise, such a system needs to be kickstarted (i.e. one of the planets needs to get resources from somewhere else) before it can work as expected (and even then, any slipgate networks they're connected to must not have dibs on their additional output).
  • Some techs increase the output of existing colonies, which may be immediately useful to their existing slipway connections, but the available resources are not properly displayed as being consumed until the next month.
  • Lastly, building a station at the extreme right edge of the map can result in its menu always being rendered off the edge of the screen.  This could be fixed if stations were restricted to being built within the same bounds as planets can occur, or if menus always rendered on screen (nudging to left, etc., as needed).

Thanks again for making such a great game.  I can't wait to see the PC version.  Please support Linux if you can, but I understand if that's infeasible.