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Gamecraft Studios

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A member registered Jun 16, 2020 · View creator page →

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(2 edits)

SPARTANS!! HEAR ME!

It is true what many of you have heard...

The Persians have gathered an army and as I speak, that army is drawing nearer to our home.

But I stand here, before you, truthfully, unafraid!

Why? Because every Spartan is worth A MILLION Persians!

And we WILL defend our home!

FOR FREEDOM! FOR SPARTA!

For Sparta is a fast-paced single-screen action game that boasts roguelike features such as gameplay changing items and procedural monsters’ waves creation in an arcade-like arena.

PLAY NOW: https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/for-sparta

Just uploaded version 1.2.3 with these improvements and noted the other suggestions as well! :)

Found and Fixed the bug! :D

I also did several balancing improvements in the 1.2.3 version, including nerfing the Rage of Sparta by reducing its ammo count to 2 and preventing ammo regen when the shield is up, like you suggested. It's really awesome now! :)

There were several other small things there. :)

Some really cool ideas you had there! Thanks for sharing them. :)

I wrote them all down to implement and play around with when we add more content (most likely after the Steam release!) :)

Hey man!

Thanks to your very detailed explanation by email of this bug I was able to fix it (without preventing the awesome item combination you got! I worked on the spear collision system instead.)

Thanks a lot! :D

Hello LoadedCube,

Thank you for the suggestions! We'll definitely keep in mind for future updates!

Cheers,

Tiago

Hello all!

In light of the newest update of my game: For Sparta (which you can get for Free before the launch here: https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/for-sparta), I decided to make a post discussing one of the improvements of the latest update as well as some of the Game Design considerations that went into making it.

First off, some context.

For Sparta is our (my brother's and mine) latest game that will be released on March 22nd. So, to help improve the game before the launch, we decided to put it up for free on Itch while it's on Beta. We are truly happy with the support the game has been getting, and we have received lots of great feedback!

One of them mentioned the environment art, and how it could benefit from some more detail. Here is how it looked:

So, since one of our players mentioned a possible way to improve the game, we dived right in, and started experimenting with the possibilities.

The first obvious thing to do, was to litter the ground with small props like plants, rocks, marks and other random things. While it definitely can help make it look better, there is a pretty important consideration: Game Design.

For Sparta is, first and foremost, a game. That means that we, as developers, must be constantly thinking about how will the player perceive and react to everything in the game.

Every element you put in the game, is like a word in a poem.

You shouldn't randomly add pretty words just because you like them, but you must consider how it fits in the whole, and in our case, the gameplay.

In For Sparta, the player will be facing endless waves of invading Persians in a single-screen arena, so the most important game design requirement is being clear about the play area and what's in them.

When we add non-gameplay elements that take the player's attention, we must make the gameplay elements (enemies, bullets, collectables) even more evident! And that inflates the whole game's attention grabbers, polluting the visuals and confusing the player.

Instead, we took this opportunity to add elements that will enforce the game design requirements, particularly focusing the player's attention on the center of the arena, where the action will take place.

Here is the comparison of the old arena and the new one:

As you can see, we added a gradient that would make the center of the arena brightest area in the image, drawing the player's attention to it.

Not only that, but we did add those small props, but not where the gameplay-relevant elements will appear, so to not compete with them. This focus on making the borders look nicer will help the player feel the gameplay elements better while being more immersed in the fantasy of the game - and hopefully lead to an overall better experience!

What did you think about the change (and the motivation)?

I would love to hear your thoughts on this interesting discussion of game design and aesthetics. If you want to dive deeper into it, I recommend this video by Jonathan Blow: 


I hope you liked this post! And I would love to know what you think about the game! :)

https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/for-sparta

I'll see you in the Pass of Thermopylae!

Bye!

I have just worked on the level art and I think it looks way better!

I focused on the "border details" to leave the main area clear for the gameplay to happen.

I would love to know what you think about the improvement! :)


I have just reworked how the game resets after the player dies and now it should be physically impossible for this bug to happen! :)

Maybe your next run will be better? :)

There are +200 items for you to craft. Surely you will get one that makes the game easier and more fun for you.

I'm really happy you liked it! :D

We have a couple of ideas of adding different game modes, and one of them could have tons of Blueprints unlocked so you can craft them at will. :) Thanks for the suggestion! :)

Thanks.

That's really strange... Because I fixed this exact bug (dying in the "Press E to make camp" state would keep this state active) a few releases back.

I quickly tried replicating it now but I couldn't make the bug happen. I will investigate it further. :)

Thanks for letting me know!

Is it possible for you to send me the latest log file (should be located in the "logs" folder where you unzipped the game)?

You can send over it to contact@gamecraftstudios.com

The catalog sounds really cool! We want to implement something like that as a post-Steam-launch update. :)

(1 edit)

Thanks!

It won't! The game is only free while it's on Beta. On March 22, it will go its (very cheap) price of $1.99. :)

If you are talking about PC gamepad support, we already have it :)

Hahaha!

I'm glad you liked it!

It was a lot of fun recording it. :)

This game is not Unity... It's a custom engine made in C++! :D

But we will release on Steam on March 22nd for $1.99. Hopefully a lot of people will like the game over there as well. :)

Other people also said that there is a spike in the difficulty, I think I might make it smoother indeed.

You are such a good player! It was a joy watching you play! :D

But next time you see the ghost, you ATTACK HIM IN FULL FORCE!!

I will share your gameplay video on our social media. :)

I just increased the chance of the Collector item to drop! But there are still 200 other items competing with it... :D

Hey!

I just released a new build where the player always looks towards the cursor!

I think it's way more responsive now. Thanks so much for your suggestion! :)

I would love to know what you think.

Wow!

Thanks so much for your comment. :D

Thanks so much for your comment!

I will experiment further with the points you mentioned. :)

Thank you so much for your comment and gameplay video! I shared it in our social media. :)

Your feedback was really nice!

I have just uploaded a new build improving the main point you mentioned regarding the difficulty in the first round.

Now, the first and second days have fewer monsters so you can learn their behavior.

PS: I just subscribed as well! Best of luck with your channel. :)

It's already in. :)

Hey!

I just updated the game and made the gold hitbox larger and all of the spawned gold in the end of the wave will be concentrated in the center - you don't have to run all over the arena to collect it now! :)

Let me know what you think! :D

Thanks for the suggestion!

I'll try to improve those points for the next update.

I just added the option to claim it!

The game will be FREE before the full release on March 22nd.

Please, let me know if it works for you! ;)


Hello all!

I have just posted my new game on Itchio: For Sparta!

https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/for-sparta

It's a game about holding endless waves of Persians in a fast-paced rogue-like arena fighter.


I would love to have your feedback on the game, particularly on the combat (is it fun?) and the run variations (are the runs unique? Do you want to play more when you die?).


Thank you so much! :)

I hope you love it.


https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/for-sparta


For Sparta

You probably heard about the Battle of Thermopylae, where 300 Spartans stood between one million Persians and the fate of Greece. Well.. 299 already fell and now only you can stop them in "For Sparta", a fast-paced single-screen arena roguelike.

For Sparta features +200 gameplay-changing items, more than 40 unique enemies and a fluid arcade-like top-down pixel art combat.


Play now for FREE: https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/for-sparta


Great review! We are glad that you liked Rogue Summoner :)

(1 edit)

In video format:



In text format:

Hello everyone!

Rogue Summoner - my third game on Steam (also present in Itch, of course) - is releasing right now!
I thought I would take the opportunity to talk a bit about the development process of Rogue Summoner (which is my first commercial game using Unity), and how it compares to my other Steam games - one created with the Unreal Engine and the other with no engines at all.





Rogue Summoner is a turn-based roguelike about placing monsters in the board and letting them fight for you.



Unity was the first engine I learned back in the late 2000s (because that was pretty much the only accessible engine at that time). I never actually finished any project, and had a hard time dealing with the code complexity as the projects grew.

However when Unreal Engine 4 was launching (back in early 2014), they started releasing a series of tutorials on Youtube showing how awesome and simple the blueprint system was. And I was like: "Really? Can I really make games with that?"
So I subscribed to Unreal Engine 4 (back then it was 19 dollars per month) and started learning it.

Needless to say, I fell in love with the ability to make games without having to type code and decided to create my first commercial project.
Three and a half years passed, and I released Eliosi's Hunt into the world on Steam and Playstation 4.
Along the way I had help from a lot of talented people who were trying to finish their first big projects just like me.
It was really cool to see the engine "growing" with the game. I started on Unreal 4.0 and shipped on 4.16, in 2017. Lots of amazing tools were added along the way (UMG and Sequencer were the main ones I had to learn in the middle of development).
Evidently, by the end of the development, I was forced to do some C++ magic in the game, mainly to ship the game on Playstation and to integrate with newer versions of the FMOD audio middleware. As you can imagine, it was complete nonsense to me - but thankfully I managed to solve all the problems I had and shipped the game.
My lack of programming experience was one of the major problems in the development, especially at the end, when the bugs started to pile up.





Eliosi's Hunt



After releasing Eliosi's Hunt, I decided to take a step back and study programming... for real.
Thankfully, I came across Handmade Hero, an educational project to teach developers how to make an entire game... absolutely from scratch.
And I absolutely loved it.

There is something really special about understanding everything that is going on with your game, and being able to step instruction by instruction and see what is going on and why.
Not only it was a very fun (but challenging) endeavor, I can actually say that I learned how to program after that.
To consolidate all that knowledge - and help people learn how to program games, just like Handmade Hero taught me - I decided to create a game from scratch and stream the entire process. It would be a smaller game than Handmade Hero and serve as an introduction to it (because the series starts in full force!)
That is how I developed my second Steam game: Break Arcade Games Out.
I ended up releasing it for free on Steam, along with the entire source code.
It took something like 80 hours to program the entire game (and engine) from scratch.





You can watch (and learn) the entire development of the game here.



After some time (and some non-game-related projects), I went back to creating video games with my brother.
When we sat down to think about the project (and how we would make it) we had to decide what game engine to use.
I already had experience with Unreal Engine, and was very passionate about making games with no engine, but.... we decided to try Unity for this project.
(More on that later)

That is when Rogue Summoner was born.
I had to learn the engine while creating the game, and it was a bit weird in the beginning to go back to watching Youtube tutorials after all those years and all those projects.







But something was different.
Because I knew exactly what would take to make the game (because I had already shipped a complex 3D game in another engine) AND I was extremely comfortable with programming in general, it was a breeze to program Rogue Summoner and to learn the new tools - especially considering that in Unity most of the game architecture is created by you, and not enforced by the engine or the tools.

In Rogue Summoner, it was very important for the gameplay to be completely predictable, so the player can learn what each monster will do (no matter how complex) and plan accordingly. Because there is a lot of action/reaction-type of behaviors and they are dependent on some animations, I had to create a robust queue system so that monsters could interrupt the play, counter attack, attack on death and use several other mechanics.
But in order to create this system (and all other systems), I just wrote regular code, interfacing as little as possible with the engine systems. Because of that, I was able to quickly program the gameplay systems (almost as if I was creating it with no engine) while making use of all the regular goodies games engine provide.







So how did these experiences compare?

Unreal is clearly the most powerful one. Not only in terms of graphics but also in terms of tools. And that is a big deal. Unreal has tons of tools to help in pretty much everything you could want in your game. In contrast, if you are making the game in your own engine you would have to create all those tools yourself (or integrate an existing tool with your engine, which can be just as difficult). Unity has most basic tools, but they are not as fleshed out as Unreal's. A lot of people create tools and sell them in the Asset Store, but using those has its pros and cons.
The biggest con of using Unreal is that since it was created for big teams to create big games, it comes with a certain complexity you will have to deal with. This complexity can easily turn into friction for smaller teams. For my brother and I, since we wouldn't even be able to leverage all the features Unreal has at our disposal for Rogue Summoner, and the friction could add up and make the development take longer and require more profiling and understanding the "best way to use the engine", we decided to try a different engine. Unreal would be better fit for a larger game with more resources, even larger than our 3.5-year project.

Making games by hand is certainly a passion of mine (and apparently, of many other people as well).
But there is a pretty big con (and a obvious one): making games is a lot of work. When you are tight on the budget and can't afford to spend months creating tech for the game, it's probably not going to be a good idea to roll out your own engine.
Even though I can make game jams with no engine pretty effectively, to create a polished, commercial-quality game is another thing. The quality bar for indies keeps rising and to support all these things that make the game shine is really not trivial.
HOWEVER, (and that's a pretty big HOWEVER) making games with no engines will improve your programming skills in an unbelievable way. You will be able to organize large amounts of code as if it's nothing. You will be able to know when you should spend time optimizing the code and when it's just a waste of time. You will know when you can create a quick hack to fix a problem and when it will bite you down the line.
These skills will come extremely in handy when creating games, no matter if you use another engine.
I would not have been able to create Rogue Summoner (while learning a new engine) as robustly and as quickly as I did had I not had the experience creating entire games from scratch, and that, especially in the long run, is worth a lot.

Unity was a perfect fit for Rogue Summoner.
Even though it doesn't have systems as robust as Unreal, the fact that it doesn't enforce a certain architecture on the gameplay code (unlike Unreal) was a pretty positive point, because I could more freely program the game and not worry too much with "how the engine wants me to do it".
Of course, using it in the long term would make spending some time to build better tools for it more viable (like the developers of Ori did).
Knowing the common ways that your code could be slow also helps you avoid the pitfalls that is very common in Unity games, in regards to smoothness of the game feel. That is something the developers of Inside (Playdead) struggled with a lot to create their (immensely polished) game, and gave a great talk about it; and most of it came naturally to me because of my experience making games with no engine. Rogue Summoner is not an action game, though, and that might have been more problematic in that case.
Another pro of Unity (at least for us here in Brazil) is that almost all devs around here use Unity, and being able to learn from them is really valuable as well.







Well, I hope you enjoyed this discussion on my experience shipping games with different engines.
If you have some time, I would really appreciate if you could check out Rogue SummonerSmiley
I'd love to know: what engines have you created games with? What did you think of each process?
I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

I hope we can continually improve the game development process and, in turn, the games we create.
Cheers!
Dan Zaidan

Rogue Summoner has been released into the world! Go get it while it's hot. :)

https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/rogue-summoner

https://store.steampowered.com/app/1355510/Rogue_Summoner/




All about Rogue Summoner

Rogue Summoner is a roguelike about summoning creatures to fight for you. It's a unique blend between turn-based tactics, roguelikes, strategy, auto battlers and even chess!

 

 After you create your strategy, the enemies will do their move, then, your creatures, each according to their behavior. To become a Rogue Summoner you must master each monster's behavior and use them creatively in combat.

Check out this developer commentary video:




Enjoy!

  Dan and Tiago Zaidan 

  - Gamecraft Studios

https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/rogue-summoner

https://store.steampowered.com/app/1355510/Rogue_Summoner/

(1 edit)

Rogue Summoner has been released into the world! Go get it while it's hot. :)

https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/rogue-summoner



All about Rogue Summoner

Rogue Summoner is a roguelike about summoning creatures to fight for you. It's a unique blend between turn-based tactics, roguelikes, strategy, auto battlers and even chess!



After you create your strategy, the enemies will do their move, then, your creatures, each according to their behavior.
To become a Rogue Summoner you must master each monster's behavior and use them creatively in combat.


Check out this developer commentary video:


Enjoy!

Dan and Tiago Zaidan
 - Gamecraft Studios


https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/rogue-summoner

Hello everyone!

Rogue Summoner - my third game on Steam - will be released in just three days! I thought I would take the opportunity to talk a bit about the development process of Rogue Summoner (which is my first commercial game using Unity), and how it compares to my other Steam games - one created with the Unreal Engine and the other with no engines at all.

Rogue Summoner is a turn-based roguelike about placing monsters in the board and letting them fight for you.

Unity was the first engine I learned back in the late 2000s (because that was pretty much the only accessible engine at that time). I never actually finished any project, and had a hard time dealing with the code complexity as the projects grew.

However when Unreal Engine 4 was launching (back in early 2014), they started releasing a series of tutorials on Youtube showing how awesome and simple the blueprint system was. And I was like: "Really? Can I really make games with that?" So I subscribed to Unreal Engine 4 (back then it was 19 dollars per month) and started learning it.

Needless to say, I fell in love with the ability to make games without having to type code and decided to create my first commercial project. Three and a half years passed, and I released Eliosi's Hunt into the world on Steam and Playstation 4. Along the way I had help from a lot of talented people who were trying to finish their first big projects just like me. It was really cool to see the engine "growing" with the game. I started on Unreal 4.0 and shipped on 4.16, in 2017. Lots of amazing tools were added along the way (UMG and Sequencer were the main ones I had to learn in the middle of development). Evidently, by the end of the development, I was forced to do some C++ magic in the game, mainly to ship the game on Playstation and to integrate with newer versions of the FMOD audio middleware. As you can imagine, it was complete nonsense to me - but thankfully I managed to solve all the problems I had and shipped the game. My lack of programming experience was one of the major problems in the development, especially at the end, when the bugs started to pile up.

Eliosi's Hunt

After releasing Eliosi's Hunt, I decided to take a step back and study programming... for real. Thankfully, I came across Handmade Hero, an educational project to teach developers how to make an entire game... absolutely from scratch. And I absolutely loved it.

There is something really special about understanding everything that is going on with your game, and being able to step instruction by instruction and see what is going on and why. Not only it was a very fun (but challenging) endeavor, I can actually say that I learned how to program after that. To consolidate all that knowledge - and help people learn how to program games, just like Handmade Hero taught me - I decided to create a game from scratch and stream the entire process. It would be a smaller game than Handmade Hero and serve as an introduction to it (because the series starts in full force!) That is how I developed my second Steam game: Break Arcade Games Out. I ended up releasing it for free on Steam, along with the entire source code. It took something like 80 hours to program the entire game (and engine) from scratch.

You can watch (and learn) the entire development of the game here.

After some time (and some non-game-related projects), I went back to creating video games with my brother. When we sat down to think about the project (and how we would make it) we had to decide what game engine to use. I already had experience with Unreal Engine, and was very passionate about making games with no engine, but.... we decided to try Unity for this project. (More on that later)

That is when Rogue Summoner was born. I had to learn the engine while creating the game, and it was a bit weird in the beginning to go back to watching Youtube tutorials after all those years and all those projects.

But something was different. Because I knew exactly what would take to make the game (because I had already shipped a complex 3D game in another engine) AND I was extremely comfortable with programming in general, it was a breeze to program Rogue Summoner and to learn the new tools - especially considering that in Unity most of the game architecture is created by you, and not enforced by the engine or the tools.

In Rogue Summoner, it was very important for the gameplay to be completely predictable, so the player can learn what each monster will do (no matter how complex) and plan accordingly. Because there is a lot of action/reaction-type of behaviors and they are dependent on some animations, I had to create a robust queue system so that monsters could interrupt the play, counter attack, attack on death and use several other mechanics. But in order to create this system (and all other systems), I just wrote regular code, interfacing as little as possible with the engine systems. Because of that, I was able to quickly program the gameplay systems (almost as if I was creating it with no engine) while making use of all the regular goodies games engine provide.

So how did these experiences compare?

Unreal is clearly the most powerful one. Not only in terms of graphics but also in terms of tools. And that is a big deal. Unreal has tons of tools to help in pretty much everything you could want in your game. In contrast, if you are making the game in your own engine you would have to create all those tools yourself (or integrate an existing tool with your engine, which can be just as difficult). Unity has most basic tools, but they are not as fleshed out as Unreal's. A lot of people create tools and sell them in the Asset Store, but using those has its pros and cons. The biggest con of using Unreal is that since it was created for big teams to create big games, it comes with a certain complexity you will have to deal with. This complexity can easily turn into friction for smaller teams. For my brother and I, since we wouldn't even be able to leverage all the features Unreal has at our disposal for Rogue Summoner, and the friction could add up and make the development take longer and require more profiling and understanding the "best way to use the engine", we decided to try a different engine. Unreal would be better fit for a larger game with more resources, even larger than our 3.5-year project.

Making games by hand is certainly a passion of mine (and apparently, of many other people as well). But there is a pretty big con (and a obvious one): making games is a lot of work. When you are tight on the budget and can't afford to spend months creating tech for the game, it's probably not going to be a good idea to roll out your own engine. Even though I can make game jams with no engine pretty effectively, to create a polished, commercial-quality game is another thing. The quality bar for indies keeps rising and to support all these things that make the game shine is really not trivial. HOWEVER, (and that's a pretty big HOWEVER) making games with no engines will improve your programming skills in an unbelievable way. You will be able to organize large amounts of code as if it's nothing. You will be able to know when you should spend time optimizing the code and when it's just a waste of time. You will know when you can create a quick hack to fix a problem and when it will bite you down the line. These skills will come extremely in handy when creating games, no matter if you use another engine. I would not have been able to create Rogue Summoner (while learning a new engine) as robustly and as quickly as I did had I not had the experience creating entire games from scratch, and that, especially in the long run, is worth a lot.

Unity was a perfect fit for Rogue Summoner. Even though it doesn't have systems as robust as Unreal, the fact that it doesn't enforce a certain architecture on the gameplay code (unlike Unreal) was a pretty positive point, because I could more freely program the game and not worry too much with "how the engine wants me to do it". Of course, using it in the long term would make spending some time to build better tools for it more viable (like the developers of Ori did). Knowing the common ways that your code could be slow also helps you avoid the pitfalls that is very common in Unity games, in regards to smoothness of the game feel. That is something the developers of Inside (Playdead) struggled with a lot to create their (immensely polished) game, and gave a great talk about it; and most of it came naturally to me because of my experience making games with no engine. Rogue Summoner is not an action game, though, and that might have been more problematic in that case. Another pro of Unity (at least for us here in Brazil) is that almost all devs around here use Unity, and being able to learn from them is really valuable as well.

Well, I hope you enjoyed this discussion on my experience shipping games with different engines. If you have some time, I would really appreciate if you could check out Rogue Summoner! :) I'd love to know: what engines have you created games with? What did you think of each process? I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

I hope we can continually improve the game development process and, in turn, the games we create.

Cheers!

Dan Zaidan

Hello all!

In anticipation to Rogue Summoner's release on September 3rd, my brother and I have been writing some pretty cool articles about the development.


Rogue Summoner's story is told through history books that teach the summoner's philosophy in an.. unorthodox way. Read all about our process of writing the story here:
https://store.steampowered.com/newshub/app/1355510/view/2878317980810181733

Worked 3.5 years on a game that didn't find commercial success.
Spent the next 3 years on work outside the games industry.
Are back making what they love!
Meet the two brothers behind Gamecraft Studios!
https://store.steampowered.com/newshub/app/1355510/view/2878317980802732675

Hello fellow summoners!

A little over two weeks to Rogue Summoner's complete Launch!

We are super happy with the result!


We have created a launch trailer highlighting all the dungeons and monsters we have created over the entire course of development (and, of course, our Early Access on Itchio).




We hope you like it!



Hello everyone!

We are very excited to announce that Rogue Summoner will be released on September 3rd 2020!



It has been a wonderful development journey and we are super happy with the result.
Today, we finished all the content for the game and released version 1.0.0 for our Early Access players!

There are 40 unique monsters and 9 types of procedurally-generated dungeons, including the two endless modes!
In the next 3 weeks (before launch) we will test the game thoroughly and squash all the nasty bugs! This will make sure your experience will be the best possible when the game comes out!




In the meantime, you can add Rogue Summoner to your Wishlist and check out our Demo!
https://store.steampowered.com/app/1355510/Rogue_Summoner/


I hope to see you there on the launch day! :)

Launch Date and Version 1.0.0!

Hello everyone! We are very excited to announce that Rogue Summoner will be released on September 3rd 2020!


   

 It has been a wonderful development journey and we are super happy with the result.

Today, we finished all the content for the game and released version 1.0.0 for our Early Access players!

There are 40 unique monsters and 9 types of procedurally-generated dungeons, including the two endless modes!

In the next 3 weeks (before launch) we will test the game thoroughly and squash all the nasty bugs!

 

In the meantime, you can add Rogue Summoner to your Wishlist and check out our Demo! https://store.steampowered.com/app/1355510/Rogue_Summoner/


I hope to see you there on the launch day! :)

Update #v0.12.0 - New Endless Game Mode!

Hello, friend!

In this exciting update, we added a new dungeon with a new game mode: True Rogue.



It is an endless adventure with increasing difficulty, where all the previous enemies will show up.

Hopefully you had a chance to learn the monsters' behaviors before, because in this dungeon they will combine in surprising ways testing even your best strategies.



This new dungeon is available for everyone who purchased the Early Access on itchio:

https://gamecraftstudios.itch.io/rogue-summoner

(You can still enjoy the 10% sale at the moment! Or get the FREE DEMO!)

I'd love to know how far you managed to get in this dungeon! My current record is 32 levels!! :)

Cheers,

Dan Zaidan