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I have no idea what "The issue isn't people being defensive Because Games" means, but I'm not so sure that you're grocking the angle that I am coming from (and what I interpret as the concept that Fenreliania is putting forward). As a creator, I have interests in being better able to signal which of my projects I've developed/released with the intention of them being "commercially viable", and which I'm just open to letting people pay me for. As a player, I'm interested in that too, though I'm more interested in individual developers' views of their own works than I am in any rules or systems.

Asking where lines should be drawn, and as I said, whether something objectively has artistic merit or intent isn't relevant - my hope was to highlight that we're not talking about a sliding scale from "commercialised" to "artistic" here...

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For better or worse, I feel like most creators (especially in games, where the medium never really had a significant period of existence before it became hyper commercialised) are likely to object to the notion of those being mutually exclusive. That's mostly because there's a sense that you can't do the former and be sustainable without embracing the latter.

In my mind, that further highlights why there's value in some kind of distinction that helps normalise/signal making stuff without the intent to squeeze every sale possible out of it, but my perspectives rarely align with everybody else's (as we can see from other replies, many people are fixating on the word "artistic" rather than the concept itself).

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I'm not certain that "artistic" is the right wording for an alternative to indicating a  work that users are expected to appreciate as professional/commercialised works, but I dig the idea in principle!

Hi hi! One of The Away Team's devs here. Have you been in touch with us about the missing DLL issue you encountered? I don't do Windows myself, but I know that lead dev Michael will be super keen to hear about this and look into the issue ahead of the big update we have planned for (fingers crossed) later this month.

Thanks for making a cool game :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Doki Doki School Club has a lot of overt problems. I am uncertain of the amount of time and attention that went into making this, but in the interests of being thorough, I'll give this project the benefit of the doubt and judge it on its own merits.

The big thing that immediately stands out are the missing image warnings for character art. These are present in most of the game's early scenes and would be worth filling with placeholder art if final assets haven't been created or sourced.

The grey text is immediately difficult to read on the black and white striped rug in the first scene's background, and continues to have contrast problems with many subsequent scenes. Some kind of solid or partially transparent background would go a long way toward helping that text be readable.

There are a large number of grammatical  errors and typos ("your" instead of "you're", missing punctuation on the end of sentences, lower case letters at the start of sentences, etc.) that the game would benefit from having addressed.

Repeated text lines such as "hello," "DELETE," "4534343", and "love" give the impression that the game has become unresponsive. An audio or visual effect when clicking through each line would give players feedback to help them understand that the game is still progressing.

The "Home" and "go" choices result in exceptions that halt the game, effectively railroading players into making the alternative decision during those choice sequences. Removing choice from players can be powerful when done intentionally and sparingly, but this kind of presentation just makes the game look broken.

From a storytelling perspective, the plot lacks structure, and there's a significant lack of characterisation. I get the impression that this is intended to feel chaotic and inscrutable, but those kinds of experiences work best when there is a relateable thread or character that the player/viewer/reader can follow along with. Putting more work into making character motivations identifiable and showing more of the impact of the story's events on the characters' emotional states would help significantly, as would putting some attention toward conscious pacing of emotional and structural beats.

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you continue development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

XO appears to be a striaghtforward and functional tic-tac-toe/naughts and crosses game, and with that in mind, there's not a lot of meaningful feedback I can give.

There may be room to add audio, fancy graphics, and AI, but I think that you accomplished what you set out to make, and so long as you learned something along the way, that's a great outcome in my eyes!


Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you continue development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

It takes a while to get the hang of the timing within the game, and I feel that there's room for improvement with regards to communicating what the windows of attack and vulnerability are. That said, it does communicate some of the risk and cost to individuals of volley fire tactics.

The character art and gunsmoke animations are rough, but nice. The rest of the game's visual presentation feels like something that could be improved upon with touches like gradients on the sky and ground, animated clouds, and iconographic indicators for timers.

The music and sound effects are decent, but repetitive. I didn't manage to make it to the Prussians, but it would be cool to hear a different music track for that battle. I'm not entirely certain, but I think I heard both nap.mp3 and brit.mp3 playing at the same time during gameplay and I'm not certain if that's intentional.

There's a neat concept here, and Granadiers was a fun submission to play.

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you continue development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

CataBlock's puzzle design is surprisingly fun and engaging, and ramps up consistently in difficulty. I played up to level 10 before I needed to move on to other games, but I did come away with the impression that some of the really tight gaps in that level were a touch too tight.

Unfortunately, there are some issues with keyboard events being mishandled (holding Space will cause the game to behave as though Space is being pressed repeatedly). This problem is present in your other submission as well, but in this case mouse controls provide a workaround.

On the note of controls, mouse X/Y input and WASD feel far too sensitive. I needed to turn my mouse's hardware DPI setting down to its lowest setting in order to be able to be able to play effectively.

I also had to give +x permissions to the game executable for this one. Typically, for Windows based developers, this is difficult to have control over, but if you're on Linux or MacOS, setting executable permissions with the "chmod" command on the game binary before zipping up the files will make sure that that's good to go on users' computers after they download and extract them.

The secret levels are a nice touch. The zero gravity level provides some interesting variation on gameplay, although an inability to reliably orient myself to be aligned with a wall in order to jump off it made that  level feel a lot more tedious than it needed to. When finishing that level, the game also doesn't return back to the previous level/continue to the next, leaving players stuck in the green rectangle until they restart or quit to the menu.

This is the stronger of your two submissions, and it seems to me that you made a good decision on which one to focus on!


Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you continue development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

C Sharp Sharp appears to be drawing inspiration from N++ , mimicing is minimalist colour palette, character presentation and level style.

Unfortunately, there are some issues with keyboard events being mishandled (holding space will cause the character to behave as though space is being pressed repeatedly), which effectively makes the first level uncompleteable. This problem is present in your other submission as well.

I also had to give +x permissions to the game executable for this one. Typically, for Windows based developers, this is difficult to have control over, but if you're on Linux or MacOS, setting executable permissions with the "chmod" command on the game binary before zipping up the files will make sure that that's good to go on users' computers after they download and extract them.

Without being able to play further, it's difficult to give meaningful feedback, but judging from the screenshots and my impression of the way the game is intended to handle, it's a good start.


Thanks for submitting and best of luck if you decide to continue development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Multiple jump and shoot actions expressed through the same controls are a straightforward, but effective way of exploring the game's theme.

The the character and foreground art style is cute and functional, though the distant buildings in the background feel bland by comparison, and enemy projectiles could have a lot more presence if they weren't grey against a grey background.

Unfortunately, gamepad bindings didn't function correctly on my Logitech F310, and the keyboard controls are awkward with dash being bound to Q and E while movement controls are mapped to the cursor keys.

Jumping physics feels rough, with the jetpack and wall climbing abilities providing significantly greater height when activated immediately after jumping rather than when close to the peak of a jump. While this might teeeeeeechnically reflect how real physics work, it feels a bit excessive and presents these types of character controls as being about double tapping rather than timing, which would be stronger and more expressive.

The structure of the level does a good job of introducing concepts and mechanics individually while feeling like "hints you find along the way" rather than "a tutorial you have to get through.

Animations and audio would also be good areas to improve the game, but there's a cool start here.


Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you continue development! :D

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Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

There's a cool glitch aesthetic at work in KILLALL that I dig. From the hexdump-esque text in the in the menu and level background to the noisy platform textures to the minimallist representations of the player and enemies, there's a "rawness" at work that feels compelling.

The exploration of the theme is interesting and provides a lot of opportunities for skillful play to feel really powerful (reinforced by screenshake and particle effects), and that's a cool thing to land on in a game jam. 

There are some issues with the player controls feeling a bit floaty and it being easy to inadvertently lift off the ground and not be able to jump, particularly when travelling downhill, but also sometimes when changing direction while at speed on a flat surface (a common problem that most physics based platformers overcome). I think that the game is still playable as is, but could be a lot stronger with tighter, more reliable controls.

The audio effects are appropriate and functional, but I'm on the fence about how well the music fits with the rest of the game. It feels bright and happy in a way that doesn't seem to reflect the kind of darker, abstract subvertive hacker vibe that I get off the rest of the game.

The single level feels like a good introduction to what a larger game like this could be like. It has solid pacing and provides some interesting challenges to master as players become familiar with the game.

KILLALL is one of my favourite submissions this year. Best of luck if you decide to continue development!


I'd also like to do a short interview with you for an article I'm writing on the 2018 Linux Game Jam. Shoot me an email via cheese@cheesetalks.net and I'll send you through some questions!

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Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

I had a lot of fun playing Project AL, and to me, it stands out as being one of the most complete experiences offered by a submission this year.

The game has a wonderful look and feel that evokes a late 80s/early 80s feel that I really dig. Juhani Junkala's public domain music really pushes the 80s feel with its chip synth sounds and driving rock beat.

Gameplay is challenging and feels nicely rewarding when secrets are discovered or a tricky move is pulled of.

It took a while for me to discover/get the hang of some of the more nuanced controls such as crouch jumping and ball mode, but once I worked them out, they were cool additions that felt like they opened up the game.

The window for double tapping feels like it might be a little too large. I often found myself accidentally dodging, particularly when trying to position AL close to the edge of a platform (which meant unintentionally flying off). Al also doesn't "stick" to sloped surfaces when travelling downhill, making jumping while descending more or less impossible (a common problem that most physics based platformers overcome).

I wasn't able to get the game's bindings to behave correctly on my Logitech F310.

I don't have much in the way of suggestions for improvement beyond experimenting with tighter controls and adding more levels. Fantastic work!

Project AL was one of my favourite submissions this year. I've spotted that you've continued working on the game since the jam and am looking forward to checking a new build out :D


I'd also like to do a short interview with you for an article I'm writing on the 2018 Linux Game Jam. Shoot me an email via cheese@cheesetalks.net and I'll send you through some questions!

All of the jam feedback I've given other games has been based on the builds that were available when the jam ended. Unfortunately, at that time, Cube Slide was still missing its _Data folder, so I'm going to give some very thoughts on the updated build I played afterward.

First up, I enjoyed what I played. There isn't a huge amount of game here, but it feels like it could be a good starting point for something larger.

As I mentioned on judges' round table video, I feel like some enforcement of pacing (a minimum speed and preventing backwards movement) would make the game feel more whole, and either some rails or resistance on the sides of the level might go towards helping round the game out.

Tiny bumps/scrapes counting as being on par with head-on collisions feels a bit off to me. I'd experiment with either ignoring impacts which don't impart more than a certain threshold of movement onto blocks, or make the player cube get larger every time there is a collision, giving some leeway for small mistakes, but also providing some disincentive (the larger the cube, the harder it is to navigate the gaps between blocks).

I had to give +x permissions to the game executable for this one. Typically, for Windows based developers, this is difficult to have control over, but if you're on Linux or MacOS, setting executable permissions with the "chmod" command on the game binary before zipping up the files will make sure that that's good to go on users' computers after they download and extract them.


Thanks for submitting, and best of luck with the project if you continue development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

I really like the exploration of the jam's theme here. You've got 7 actions that you're expressing with two keys in ways that are possible to learn and master. I did find though, that the control layout and/or the level layout didn't lead to natural combinations of actions, and I can't help but feel that discarding the left/right move controls and having the left/right hop action triggered when holding down a direction would allow the game to flow better.

The time pressure provided by the rising lava might be a touch high, but I understand and appreciate the drive to create a challenging experience that requires many attempts and has more opportunity to stay in players' minds than an easy experience that a player will move on from and forget. In a larger game, this wouldn't be the right point on a difficulty curve to start at, but when there's only a single level, it's often best to focus on what represents what the game would be somewhere near its peak.

I had to give +x permissions to the game executable for this one. Typically, for Windows based developers, this is difficult to have control over, but if you're on Linux or MacOS, setting executable permissions with the "chmod" command on the game binary before zipping up the files will make sure that that's good to go on users' computers after they download and extract them.

Flopper didn't make my list of top favourites from the jam, but it was on my shortlist and was very hard to take off.


I spotted that you've continued to work on the game after the jam ended, and I'm looking forward to seeing what directions you're taking it in. Thanks for submitting and best of luck with continued development! :D

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Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Signal bounce feels like an interesting concept. The notion of changing the world around a target in order to keep it safe like some kind of inverse Flappy Bird appeals to me.

The implementation here, however, feels like it leads towards chaotic gameplay. The game feels like it wants to be about guiding and maneuvering the ball through oncoming waves of penguins, but seems to end up giving the greatest rewards to launching the ball as high into the air as possible and hoping it doesn't hit anything on the way down.

Some form of ceiling to contain the ball within the penguin-populated area feels like it would go along way toward making control more viable. If that ceiling stayed parallel to the floor, that would allow for exerting downward force on the ball to avoid a penguin, and could offer further opportunities for varying gameplay by flipping gravity.

Penguin sounds are always delightful, and I appreciate the way its jarring nature emphasises failure.

I suspect that most players won't notice, but I absolutely dig the way that the background audio changes with the waveform of the floor. Conceptually, I'd love it even more if adjusting the amplitude of the waveform affected the amplitude of the audio, but I suspect that in practice, that would be irritating.

I didn't manage to get a score much higher than 35, and I found the game most interesting when trying to focus on ball control (this invariably lead to lower scores, though). I did enjoy playing it though!

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you decide to continue development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

There's a bunch of interesting tone at play in Three Ships. The game feels melancholy, but vibrant at the same time. I like the "four rockets and a nudge" aspect and appreciate the way it requires players to get up close and interact with the rocks instead of just shooting them from a distance.

The artwork is simplistic, but is enhanced by small touches like moving clouds and bubbles floating up out of a lava vent. The ukulele music at the end is cute!

The middlemost ship has a rock wedged into it that will carry the ship upward and prevent the game from being completeable if the player doesn't manage to fire a rocket into it before it leaves the screen. Beyond that and some grammatical issues in the title text, the game seems bug-free.

That said, there are a few rough areas that are worth noting. The controls feel a bit too sensitive, and I often found myself accidentally overshooting rocks. A greater feeling of claustrophobia/being enclosed in dangerous waters could be achieved by preventing the the submersible from leaving the water.

The ending comes across as being a little abrupt, and could be made to feel less sudden if progress was counted when a ship reached the surface rather than when a rocket hits a ship.

The atmosphere of the ending suggest a greater connection between the player and the rescued ships/crews than the introductory text indicates. I think that there's room in Three Ships for that narrative to be expanded and explored.


Thanks for submitting and best of luck if you decide to continue development! :D

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Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

At first, I didn't expect to get much out of VING. Sure, it's a nice game, but the controls feel a little awkward and the enemies are a bit floaty. There's no audio, and the background sprites are repetitive.

What I found unexpectedly appealing about VING is the way that attention has been given to the experience as a whole. Instead of focusing on polishing individual facets of the game like enemy animations or fluid player control, the game embraces its rough edges and invites the player to master them.

I'm going to spoil what makes the game special here and talk about the way that I came to understand VING. If anybody reading would like to experience that for themselves, stop reading now!

This clicked for me when objectives shifted from "Kill X enemies!" to "Traverse the environment quickly." The role of enemies immediately shifts through the change in context, and the game stops being about getting projectile alignment just right for enemies who're creeping closer just below your line of fire and becomes about careening through the map's obstacles. At this point, damage rates and the relationships between enemy movement and player movement feel far more deliberate.

The objectives continue to reframe the game, culminating in a challenging bossfight that requires awareness and use of all of the game's nuances.

At this point, it's easy to assume that the game has revealed all that it is, but at the death of the boss, the player's attacks change to a supercharged auto firing version of the charged shot as all of the previously inanimate obstacles come to life and charge at the player with gaping maws and glowing eyes .

This final sequence requires far different behaviour than the single-focus boss fight and has more in common with a survival objective from earlier in the game. It's an absolutely wonderful moment where, for the first time, the game changes its mechanics in order to give a new experience that smashes the expectations that have been built up and morphed through the preceding stages.

I'm hard pressed to think of much that I would recommend changing or adding to VING beyond audio and some variation in the background sprite to make tiling a bit less prominent. There's definitely room for smoothing away some of the other rough edges, such as player movement controls, the "stickiness" of obstacles, the speed of the boss' "sprint" action, and the lack of enemy animations, but I feel that such changes would need to be handled delicately and thoughtfully in order to preserve the game's identity, challenge and charm.

VING was one of my favourite submissions this year! I really enjoyed the challenges it offered and the surprises it gave.


I'd also like to do a short interview with you for an article I'm writing on the 2018 Linux Game Jam. Shoot me an email via cheese@cheesetalks.net and I'll send you through some questions!

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Conceptually, I dig this game. The idea of giving sad friends high fives to cheer them up and find out what they do when happy is lovely. Unfortunately, the high fiving visually reads as slapping, which puts an entirely different spin on things!

The art has a lovely scribbly quality to it that evokes a sense child-like play, which supports the intended atmosphere well. The faces on all friends feel like they're positioned too far to the left, leaving some facial features (particularly on frogs) floating out in the air.

I like the way that the catapults provide access to different areas of the level, but it's very easy to wind up stuck inside something (particularly for catapults where the far end isn't visible and knowing the safe position to stand requires having previously visited that area).

Ultimately though, the thing I've enjoyed most about playing this game is that things aren't immediately obvious and it's up to me to experiment and interpret what things are and how they work. Games that allow for "wonder" are few and far between these days, and in spite of its issues, Cheer was refreshing to explore.

I think you've got a good start and the right ingredients for a fun and happy experience.


Thanks for your submission and best of luck if you continue with development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Audible Dribble is, hands down, the most original submission this year. It is always enjoyable to come across unconventional, out-of-the-box, or subversive experiences that ask me to think differently about what games can be, and jams are a great environment to experiment and explore the space beyond games' typical identities.

There is some awkwardness present that goes beyond the unfamiliarity of something new. As noted in the "caveats" section of the game page, certain frequencies represented within the game are difficult for a human to make via phonation (larynx-produced sounds), and a lack of calibration options for input sensitivity/granularity could go a long way toward making the game feel more controllable and less susceptible to noise interference.

The gameplay as currently presented is limited to maneuvering a ball into a box by bouncing it off a segmented floor that acts as a historgram of detected sounds. The combinations of ball position, velocity and direction only provide a small amount of variation before exhausting what the game has to offer.

It would be interesting to explore these kinds of controls in different contexts, such as guiding the ball around obstacles, hitting a moving target, or rolling the ball to specific positions without exceeding a maximum height. I could even imagine similar controls being interesting for a "platformer" of sorts where every platform had a sound controlled surface that the player used to guide a ball through more complex environments.

I'd also be interested to see whether an interpolated curve gave more control than the discrete bars present in the game at the moment.

I've played and seen a number of voice controlled games before, but nothing that attempts to implement this level of vocal control over manipulating an in-game world to influence entities. What's here is still pretty rough, but it's inspiring!


I'd also like to do a short interview with you for an article I'm writing on the 2018 Linux Game Jam. Shoot me an email via cheese@cheesetalks.net and I'll send you through some questions!

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Overwhelming Odors stands out as one of the more unique submissions this year. Its inhale/exhale based mechanics to attract and repel different smells was unexpected.

There isn't a lot of artwork here, but what there is is fun, and the face feels surprisingly expressive given that only its pupils and nose move.

Unfortunately, noted bugs with win/lose conditions make the game's objective difficult to discern.

Most of the suggestions I would have had are covered in the list of missing features on the game page, so I think you were heading in a good direction. It would be interesting to see how a "wind" mechanic that affected the direction and velocity of all smells would change the flow of the game.

There's an interesting concept at work here, but one that's hampered by a lack of clear objectives and player feedback.

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you continue development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Laser Temple is one of the most complete and cohesive submissions this year.

The four colour CGA palette is wonderful, and coupled with chip-style sounds and mysterious music, does a great job of communicating the feel of an ancient alien temple. The puzzle elements found within the temple are distinct, but also carry a sense of vagueness in a way that make their purposes feel like a mystery until they've been encountered.

Puzzle complexity ramps up nicely, but doesn't really progress into challenging territory, leaving most solutions easy to discover without moving a piece. I don't think this is a problem for a jam game, but a larger scale game could benefit from dead-end solutions and more temple elements that change/affect the puzzle layouts in ways that aren't identifiable until they're interacted with (for example, perhaps moving a totem onto a switch tile could make a new section of floor appear).

The story of a lost team of sentinels in need of rescue leading the player deep into an alien temple feels like an evocative start, and though I was a little disappointing to not see that expanded upon I don't think that really detracts from the game that's here. In a larger version of this game, it might be interesting to have narrative breaks along the way as you find evidence of Kisaka's team that give players a moment to think about what they've done, what happened to the people you're trying to rescue, and what all this alien temple stuff might mean (without removing the mystery, of course).

Another possible consideration would be to switch the colour palette from the cool cyan/purple dominated CGA palette to the warm red/green dominated palette to communicate progress deeper into the temple.

There are also a number of grammatical issues and typos in the text as well that would be worth looking into.

Laser Temple is one of my favourite submissions this year, and I'm looking forward to seeing where the project goes from here!

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with continued development :D


I'd also like to do a short interview with you for an article I'm writing on the 2018 Linux Game Jam. Shoot me an email via cheese@cheesetalks.net and I'll send you through some questions!

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Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Slime the room! is super cute. There's not a lot of art here, but what there is is charming.

The difficulty curve is for the most part nicely presented, and I like the way that mechanics/hurdles are introduced in environments where they're not overwhelming, but still enough of a mystery that they provide a bit of an "Ah ha!" moment when things click.

I feel like the game maybe could do more to encourage make practical use of mops instead of just avoiding them in later levels.

I encountered the odd physics issue where I would bounce in an unexpected direction when moving at speed (likely to do with the slime passing partway into a wall before physics catches up), but that happened rarely. There are also some issues with keyboard events being mishandled (sometimes holding space will cause the slime to behave as though space is being pressed repeatedly).

I had to give +x permissions to the game executable for this one. Typically, for Windows based developers, this is difficult to have control over, but if you're on Linux or MacOS, setting executable permissions with the "chmod" command on the game binary before zipping up the files will make sure that that's good to go on users' computers after they download and extract them.

I managed to play through all of the levels before I had to move onto other submissions, and had a bunch of fun!

Thanks for your submission and best of luck if you continue development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Unfortunately, I was unable to have a proper play of this one due to only having one gamepad to test with, so my feedback here is going to be pretty superficial.

Character handling feels pretty solid. The level layout (assuming there is only one) is simple, but looks solid enough to allow players to engage/hide from one another.

The backgrounds from Jesse M's jungle asset pack always look lovely when parallaxing, and the Open Pixel Project character art fits in surprisingly well.

I see that keyboard support has been added after the jam ended, and I hope that that has made the game more accessible to more players.

Thanks for your submission and best of luck with continued development! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

I found myself enjoying the fuzziness and uncertainty of the visual presentation, especially when it came to interacting with unknown characters and objects for which it would be possible to infer context for afterward. These moments of realisation can be powerful, but I feel that across a longer experience, it would be very easy to overuse them.

Without more context, the plot feels a little gratuitous and likely sits outside the bounds of my personal tastes, but it's got a sense of weight to it and in that sense is structurally sound, providing that it leads into something that makes that weight resonate.

The presentation of the sword duel before the main menu feels at odds with the rest of the game, but is evocative in its own way. If it's intended to be a splash screen that's not related to the game, it doesn't feel like it carries enough identifiable branding for that to carry through.

I think you've got a good start here, even if it's not my kind of thing.

Thanks for your submission and best of luck with the project if you decide to continue working on it :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

I have a lot of fondness for the swordplay in the original Prince of Persia game, and playing Two Button Knight started to evoke similar feelings once I'd gotten the hang of it. The implementation here is also a great expression of the jam theme, with two buttons being used to control a total of seven actions in a way that (after some time) feels pretty natural.

Audio and visual assets are simple, but fill their roles and do an adequate job of presenting the game. Character animations are rough, but charming. The attack animations do a nice job of conveying a sense of some of the weight of a sword.

There are two small, but noteworthy points that I think hold the game back a little bit.

The first is intermittent input inconsistencies, which seem to mostly manifest when transitioning from walking into another action, and can leave a player unexpectedly vulnerable at a critical moment (typically when approaching to attack). My impression is that when this happens, any key pressed during the double tap window will be ignored and will restart the double tap window from that point. Since button mashing feels like the Wrong Way to play this game, it's not something that feels like it crops up often, but when it does it feels significant.

The second relates to timing and signalling. The kind of game that I'd love to play this as would allow for players to reactively block incoming attacks. Currently, the amount of advance warning given by the attack animations before the window to effectively block closes feels too small to take intentional advantage of, leaving the game feeling more luck focused than skill focused.

For smoother deployment, I'd suggest shipping future builds in a tar.gz or zip archive. You won't get much in the way of meaningful compression thanks to AppImage, but it will preserve +x permissions.

Two Button Knight was one of my favourite submissions this year, and is very close to being a game that I'd play for fun with friends/in my own time.

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you continue development :D


I'd also like to do a short interview with you for an article I'm writing on the 2018 Linux Game Jam. Shoot me an email via cheese@cheesetalks.net and I'll send you through some questions!

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Short, but sweet!

The Lord of Sands stands out as one of the more polished submissions this year, and presents an experience that is well paced and feels whole.

I have a lot of love for the game's minimalist style. The articulated "cute" demon is wonderfully animated. Parallaxing clouds and screenshake are executed well and give a great sense of scale. There's a high bar set here, but it's one that makes the player's tank feel out of place, with its flat sprite popping out against the perspective implied by the rest of the game's visuals.

The two firing modes are a nice attempt at interpreting the theme, but I can't help but feel that this would be much stronger if the default small shot had some tactical value that wasn't dramatically outweighed by the power of the super shot. I'd be interested to see how the game would play out if the hand smacking phases were accompanied by waves of small mobs or homing projectiles that the player needed to use the rapid fire small shot to take down.

The audio has a retro feel to it, established by the opening rumble as the demon emerges. The player and enemy hit sound effects almost feel like drum samples, and there's a fun kind of rhythm that emerges from the bullet patterns when taking damage while firing back. Music is notably absent, and might add a lot to the game's atmosphere, but I think that The Lord of Sands stands up well enough without it.

The Lord of Sands is one of my favourite submissions this year.

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you decide to continue work on it :D


I'd also like to do a short interview with you for an article I'm writing on the 2018 Linux Game Jam. Shoot me an email via cheese@cheesetalks.net and I'll send you through some questions!

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

There's a lot of cool stuff going on in Wereshift. On the surface, it has solid visual design and a lot of cool atmosphere. The "versatile verbs" theme is expressed through three different forms that respond to the same controls in different ways: human (stealth), wolf (movement speed), and werewolf (attack speed).

Looking deeper reveals a bunch of systems at work. Health drains over time, but hiding in bushes will halt that drain, and killing enemies will restore health. Enemy AI has several alert states that change how and weather they react to you in your various forms. Alerted peasants will occupy buildings and fire arrows, but will leave when they are no longer alert. Transforming into human form is only allowed when in the shadow of a house. AI will not react to you when you are in human form unless they have seen you transform. All of these elements end up playing into each other in ways that encourage and reward a variety of approaches. It's rare to see this level of (game) design thoughtfulness in a jam game.

That said, there are several issues and areas that feel like they have room for improvement. Wereshift doesn't communicate objectives to players very clearly, and many of the game's nuances aren't apparent without spending a length of time with the game that will likely far exceed the amount of deaths a player is likely to give a jam game before moving on.

Unfortunately, a bug also prevents nights from ending unless all humans have been killed, which takes away some of the stealth/pacifist gameplay options, and limits the opportunities to players to progress to the next night and feel like they're making headway enough to pay attention to the game's smaller details.

With the high production values of everything else, audio feels notably absent (I understand that currently this is a limitation of the in-development engine). There's a big opportunity to enhance the game's atmosphere and push tonal shifts between the player's different forms (for example, human form could be accompanied by eerie and unsettling music as you pass among and mingle with your enemies, while werewolf form could have a driving beat that carries the energy and excitement of your most powerful form).

Since Wereshift is such a strong title, I believe it can stand up to some extra scrutiny of some of its mechanics that feel like they need some extra tuning. I've offered some suggestions here, but they are by no means the only way to address these concerns.

The werewolf form is effective at crowd control, but it's hard to discover that until wading into a crowd as a werewolf, something that is itself difficult to stumble upon thanks to the werewolf's slow movement speed on approach. I'd be interested to see how the game felt with werewolves doing a touch more damage against individual enemies, and whether that would encourage players to choose warewolf form when leaping into crowds.

The wolf form's higher movement speed makes it the most versatile for exploration and traversal of the game's environments, but I'd love to see that movement versatility extended to allow the wolf form access to places that other forms could not reach. These could offer alternate hiding spaces (such as hopping up in a tree), or alternate paths at the cost of higher visibility (such as running along rooftops).

Human form currently feels like the least flexible and most risky. This in itself makes for an interesting risk vs reward proposition for the stealth cover it provides, but there's little in the way of reward for using it. If you're observed changing into human form, enemies will attack, and if nobody is around to observe, there's nothing to hide from, as the player reverts to wolf form once leaving the shadow of a building. I'd be interested to see what impact human form would have on the game if it prevented health drain or even allowed slow health recovery, and allowed players to remain in human form for a period of time long enough to reach other buildings.

With nights not progressing naturally, it's difficult to weigh up the broader game objectives, but my general impression is that the intended 5 minute night duration might be a bit long. There's not much of a sense of urgency to explore or kill, and nothing to drive players to take risks when attempting to play stealthily. There's also incentive to encourage players to not hide in a bush for 5 minutes. I can't help but feel that some alternate goal with higher reward, such as killing a specific NPC or stealing an item from the middle of town could provide some objectives that encourage players to strive for well executed infiltration and/or combat (with the existing survive/kill everyone objectives still available as a fallback).

One final thing I'd be interested to experiment with would be conferring additional damage on enemies who are attacked while not alerted. This would add some extra incentive to pursue stealth gameplay, and give the wolf form an extra edge when launching from cover at an enemy.

Wereshift was one of my favourite submissions this year, and I'm very much looking forward to seeing what comes next. I am a werewolf, awoo!


I'd also like to do a short interview with you for an article I'm writing on the 2018 Linux Game Jam. Shoot me an email via cheese@cheesetalks.net and I'll send you through some questions!

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

This one is a difficult game to give feedback on! Since the game content primarily comes from third party songs, we need to focus more on implementation than I usually would with a jam game.

The readability of red and blue beat colouring feels clear, and though the character animations aren't behaving, there's a certain charm to the mangled stilt-legged D -Man with his eyes off in the distance that's endearing as he hops from shipping container to shipping container.

I don't have enough familiarity with these sorts of games to have much perspective on where the sweet spot of balance between challenging and unforgiving is, so it's difficult for me to offer feedback on that as well.

As with other commentors, I had a lot of trouble getting this one running on Fedora. The game doesn't seem to find a device regardless of which backend is selected. It seems to run happily in Ubuntu, though.

You mentioned wanting to make the background more responsive to your actions/performance, and wanting to have discrete modes that players need to switch between to progress. Both of these sound like good directions to take the game in. Calibration options to compensate for input delay seem to be a common feature for rhythm based games and might be worth considering as well.


Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project if you continue with it! :D

Hi! I understand - I was aware that you'd moved away from mouse input (which has clear advantages) before I posted, but I wanted to give this judging feedback that was based on my experiences of the end of jam build and what it evoked in me since that is what I'm offering to all participants.

I plan to play the new version, but unfortunately it's going to be a while before I have time.

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

I really like the concept here. Inviting player to be thoughtful about and embrace efficiency for what might be button mashing gameplay in another game.

The three levels included in the game do a good job of introducing and then allowing players to explore the game's mechanics, but there's definitely room to expand this into something bigger if you're keen (and I see from your plan file that you are!).

At the moment, I feel like the game could be more solid with variation in roles between the game's two munitions, which would in turn open up more opportunities for "puzzle design". Perhaps the slug could cause chain reactions that would destroy certain types of targets within a radius, or the explosive could pass over the first target of a certain type - both of these kinds of behaviours would allow each weapon to fulfill roles that the other couldn't, and would provide opportunities for each to hinder or enhance the other's abilities.

I dig the retro aesthetic across the entire game, but the scrolling credits/instructions above and below the main menu is the bit that really set the scene for me on that front.

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project! :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Juan's Saga is an absolutely adorable tribute to one of the Godot engine's core developers (who as an affinity for alpacas). The art style is simple but bold, and the music is super happy.

The game loop is straightforward, but feels like a good start to a larger game (and based on the additional mechanics and enemies I've seen screenshots of, it seems like it was!).

The combination of mouse and keyboard controls feels like it's leading somewhere interesting, but I found myself strugging to perform any meaningful mouse actions when moving. I'd be keen to see how different the game would feel if movement was world-relative whenever the camera was moving instead of screen-relative.

Part of me would be excited to see more variation in the kinds of interactions players can have with bugs that had tactical value that varied depending on context (for example, maybe clicking and dragging a bug attached to the player could throw it a short distance, freeing Juan up for a jump when he's been attacked by a single bug, but being less useful when there are many bugs around).

It's been great to see you continue work on the game, and it seems like you're taking the game in fun directions. I'm looking forward to playing the new version!

Thanks for your submission and best of luck with the project :D

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Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

There's something poetically wonderful about the juxtaposition between a rogue-like dungeon crawler (something I'm very familiar with) and the world of dance clubs, qties, and dabs (which still confuses me).

Woguey Wikey's hot pink levels populated by nerdies and jello shots remind me a little of the first time I played NetHack. Surrounded by characters, items and stats I didn't understand, it was up to me to explore, examine ,and experiment as I fumbled my way around its dungeons and learned to kick sinks. Woguey Wikey is far less complex, and I have a bit of rogue-like experience to fall back on this time, but its vernacular is entirely foreign and inscrutable to me in a way that is surprisingly exciting. What does style do? Will this ugly be friends with me? Why am I doing 80s dance moves after using vodka?

Interface-wise, I found myself wishing that the game handled keyboard input better and responded immediately to key-up events instead of processing queued key-repeat events. Running to the end of a hallway would often leave me bumping into a wall while a foe dabbed on me. Alternatively a shortcut to move in a given direction until hitting a wall or getting close to an enemy would be great.

My keyboard layout also doesn't have a '<' key (it's a secondary function on the ',' key), but that was easy enough to modify (suggested changes submitted via a pull request), and after that small tweak, I went on to be slain by a Daddy on the 5th floor.

If there's one thing that feels like it's missing from this game (other than being able to interact with corpses passed out clubbers), it's audio. A muffled doof beat could up the game's atmosphere by a lot, and effects like the clink of glass when drinking a shot would add icing to an already delicious and (in its own minimalist way) vibrant cake.

~Woguey Wikey~ isn't didn't make my list of top favourites from the jam, but it was on my shortlist and was very hard to take off.

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project! I'm super happy to see that you've continued with development :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

I like the concept here - counterintuitive controls in a familiar game are a not just a fun way to explore how our brains are wired to handle specific input/output loops, but can also give us new perspectives to view those familiar games from.

Unfortunately, the input bindings for the second player are either not working or not what they are documented as, and I feel like I was not able to get the full experience of playing against an opponent who has as much control as I did.

The sources appear to have the up control (the one that's not working) bound to the up cursor key, but unfortunately, I wasn't able to open the project in the version of Godot that I have installed to dig in any further.

Thanks for submitting!

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Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

As someone with fondness for and personal investment in text adventures, I was delighted to see this entry. ENDUSER is well written, and its balance of humour, self loathing and a familiar-but-odd view of its world makes for a delightfully surreal experience.

The "gimmick" of using various body parts as a verbs is fun, and a great exploration of the jam theme, but does get a little cumbersome over time. I'd love to see the game accept plural/singular variants for body parts (eg: "use brain" or "use hands") and have accelerators like tab completion and command history, but these are areas for potential polish rather than fundamental issues.

The game doesn't provide much in the way of directional cues, which on one hand makes it difficult to intentionally make progress, but on the other hand supports an air of aimlessness and awkwardness that I think supports the game's atmosphere.

The use of minor sound effects and music/ambient audio are great, and imbue ENDUSER's environments with a sense of oppressive indifference.

After exploring the apartment, venturing into the outside world, and diving into a dumpster, I eventually stopped after experiencing a crash. I'm looking forward to playing more, though, and hold ENDUSER as one of my favourite submissions this year.


I'd also like to do a short interview with you for an article I'm writing on the 2018 Linux Game Jam. Shoot me an email via cheese@cheesetalks.net and I'll send you through some questions!

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

There's no a lot to give feedback on here that wouldn't just be highlighting things that you already know are missing. It's very clear that this is not the game you were hoping to make, and there's not enough present to really represent or hint at the vision you had for it.

Instead, I want to highlight that one of the most important things you can get out of a game jam is the opportunity to learn. Whether that's learning something about your own limits, the tech you're using, or the game you're making, this is still valuable. It takes a bunch of courage and humility to upload an unfinished thing at the end of a game jam, and I'm glad you did.

Thanks for submitting and best of luck with the project! As I said in the judges round table video, I'm interested to see what journeys Stickman goes on :D

Note that this feedback is based on the build(s) available at the end of the jam.

Regarding what was present at the end of the jam, you may want to look at bending your character's arms and legs a little more. Godot also has the ability to blend animation states using the AnimationTreePlayer node, which could help you make the transitions between changing direction changing and actions less jarring.

Some barrier to prevent falling out of the level, or a maximum distance the player can fall before they die/their position is reset would be another good thing to look into.

It seems like you might have overextended your reach with this one a little, but I'm glad to see that you've continued development. Adding enemies and making the game wave based seems like a good direction to go in.

Thanks for submitting and good luck with the project! :D

P.S. I had a go of the updated browser version, and I get an "wants" pop-up that refuses to go away when loading the gun in the Wetwork puzzle.