Indie game storeFree gamesFun gamesHorror games
Game developmentAssetsComics
SalesBundles
Jobs

womcauliff

6
Posts
A member registered Jul 15, 2019

Recent community posts

I found this game sort of thought-provoking. What does it mean to play a game knowing I'll realistically never have a shot at winning it?

(1 edit)

Like others, I also couldn't make it past the "don't break your own rule" part. But still, I enjoyed it!

It sort of reminds me of aspects of Undertale, with the heart as the player's cursor, the music-tone sound effects for the text dialogue, and the meta-thinking where you are supposed to question the mechanics of the game itself (Flowey not telling you that EXP = "execution points").

You're definitely onto something here!

Update: I finally did it and reached the end! :]

One of my favorite things about this is the mechanic synergy of chucking the magic-8-ball gravity well to form a group of cacti, and then tossing the chemical beaker to blow them all up. I would love to see more synergy between items you can pick up.

Really loved: the premise of seeing in single color at a time, the visual aesthetic, and the music!

I didn't initially understand that the giant block is a checkpoint. I think it would be good to add some kind of positive feedback (audio or visual) that indicates to the player that they have actually succeeded by reaching it. It also tells them to expect a new pattern of obstacles.

Clever and genuinely funny!

It reminded me of the "User Inyerface" game that came out recently (https://www.theverge.com/tldr/2019/7/3/20681538/user-inyerface-terrible-modern-web-design-app-forms-fields).

Not sure if this represents a new trend of games, but I think it's interesting that folks are designing games that examine our relationship with clunky software.

This game reminds me of Atari's Missile Command, a classic defense game.  I do not feel this game runs far enough with the "only one" theme, given that the player is the only defender in most games of this genre.