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lysander

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A member registered Apr 02, 2015 · View creator page →

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Hi there! Don't worry, we got your submission! You should be able to find it on the submissions page.

Please use this form if you'd like critique on your game!

Game Title/URL: Self-explanatory.  Link your game here. 

Pitch/Information: A short description of the game.

I'd like feedback on: You can put a list, questions, or description of what you would like critique on. Can be "anything!" if you're not looking for anything specific.

I need help on: Optional; remove if unnecessary, but if you have a specific problem or bug that you would like help or advice with solving, put it here!

Hello everyone! Thank you for joining us for another session of My First Game Jam! As with every jam before it, it's time for the post-jam wrap up and the best part— sharing your work! Now, what's next you ask?

A) Write a post-mortem!

A post-mortem is an analysis of a project's process—what was successful and what was less successful? The purpose of a post-mortem is to understand what really worked for you or your team and what broke down. Did you struggle or get stuck on one mechanic? Did your team communicate well? Did your audio person have enough resources to work with?

You can write your post-mortem as a final post to your devlog (and we encourage it for consistency!) or you can post it as a separate thread with [Post-mortem] as a tag in the title.

Check out these post-mortems on Gamasutra for some inspiration (and maybe see if you can find your favorite titles!) Don't feel that you have to match the tone of these articles, though. Your post-mortem for the jam can be as formal or as informal as you'd like--all you really need to document is what worked and what didn't!

B) Share your games!

Time to show off what you finished (or didn't finish!) We've provided a separate thread specifically for playtesting and sharing right over here. Please follow the instructions provided if you'd like to receive critique on your game!

C) Play some games!

Now this is the part where you get finally relax! Go check out your fellow jammers' work and don't forget to leave a comment and let them know how they're doing! The community is the lifeblood of this game jam, so we encourage you guys to reach out and leave feedback on your peers' games!

D) Let us know how we're doing!

If you have any comments, concerns, or ideas for future jams, please let us know! We rely on you guys to help us improve your jam experience so please don't hesitate to give us some feedback via our exit polls, which should be arriving in your inboxes shortly if you filled our pre-jam poll! Our ask box is always open if the FAQ doesn't cover everything!

Thanks for joining us again, and we hope to see you guys again in the winter! 

Getting Started

Hello everyone and welcome to our Summer 2019 edition of My First Game Jam! For the uninitiated, this game jam is designed for beginner game developers to try their hand at making something new, or for experienced developers to practice new skills and experiment. If you'd like to take a look at past jams, check out this link!

Here's a few tips and links to help you get the most out of the jam. If we didn't cover something in this guide, try our FAQ or message us on tumblr or twitter.  Additionally,  familiarize yourself with our community's Code of Conduct. Remember, this jam is meant to be a safe space for everyone. 

We highly suggest you go over this post thoroughly.

Check out our resources!

We've compiled tons and tons of lists and threads for you guys in order to help you out on your jam journey.

Wondering what engine to use? We've got a post for that.  Still stuck on your concept? Try some of these idea generators.  Completely clueless as to where to start? Try this thread. Need a team for the jam? Check the teamfinding channel on our Discord. Looking for gamedev resources? We got you covered.  Looking for free assets? Guess what— we've got a list for that too.

Still need some help? Shoot us a question and we'll see what we can do.

Make a dev log on the community!

A development blog is a blog in which a game developer or team talks about the process they've made over the course of the game's creation. Maintaining a devblog keeps your audience in the know and helps facilitate productivity so you'll have something to blog about. It also serves as a record of problems you encounter as well as the solutions you find for those problems.

Development logs are essentially the same thing, except we'll be using the jam forums rather than a blog. However, you are free to use both the forums and your own blog as you develop your game.

Doing so is not necessary at all, but check out all the logs from our first jamIn order to get the most out of your jam experience, it is vital that you interact with your fellow jammers and the community surrounding it. They'll provide valuable feedback and support to help you along the way. So please, we encourage you to mingle, post in other logs, and of course post your own!

In addition, you are encouraged to add images and gifs. Here's some programs to help facilitate that:

Post daily updates!

Post screenshots or fun mishaps to your dev log, twitter, tumblr, or your own blog to track your progress and get feedback. Tag your posts as #MyFirstGameJam so other jammers can find your work! To get the most exposure you can also tag #gamedev or #ScreenshotSaturday for Saturdays! Share your work and link back to your devlog to get feedback.

Manage your time and tasks!

We compiled a list here of useful time and task management tools. Set goals early and keep track of how fast it takes you to reach them!

Join the jam chat!

You can go to the discord chat here! Not only is it a great place to interact with other jammers, but it's also a great place to get instant advice, help, and feedback on your progress. You can also get in touch with your jam hosts this way if you have any questions, or are looking for a team.

Be nice!

No one likes being told their game sucks. That's just how it is. And while it's true that in the real world one must face harsh criticize, here at My First Game Jam we aim to create a constructive atmosphere and encourage rather than discourage. Don't be a jerk, and don't give unsolicited critique unless you've been asked to. Always remember to highlight strong points as well as weak points. And, please remember, no one here is trying to put you down. Before you react, ask for clarification. Chances are that no one meant any harm.

Aaaand good luck!

Gamedev can be exciting, frustrating, and extremely rewarding. We hope to give you the tools to help you succeed in your goals in the next two weeks! Remember, if you have any questions please feel free to contact one of your jam hosts. You can message one of us in the discord chat, post on our FAQ thread, or tweet/send an ask to our Twitter or Tumblr.

Some last minute tips:

  • Don't overestimate your skills. Gamedev is a hard and often rocky road and is the culmination of skills that often take years to master. You're going to find yourself getting frustrated, so it's okay to scale back your game.
  • Communicate with your team. It's unwise to let salt build up and be passive-aggressive— this will only take away from your work. Be honest, be clear, and be understanding.
  • 2 weeks isn't enough time to make your magnum opus. You'll set yourself up for disappointment that way. Instead, try to set realistic goals for yourself for your schedule and your allotted work time.
  • Interact with other developers! This will vastly improve your game jam experience, and you'll get to share content, meet new people, and hopefully make friends along the way!
  • Google is your friend.  I don't think this can be stressed  enough. A lot of programming and coding is... essentially knowing how to google things. Don't be afraid to google the shit out of your questions, because it's extremely likely that someone's had the same issue as you at some point.
  • Check out game engine forums. Usually these come attached to the sites you download the engine from, and they're usually stuffed full of information on how to use your engine of choice. We've linked a few resources on our resource list, but this will save you (and us) a lot of time.
  • Remember to take breaks and hydrate! You're gonna be sitting at your PC for hours at a time— so don't forget to stretch your legs every so often.
  • Can't finish your game? Submit it anyway! Be proud of whatever you did, even if you only got through one stage of your platformer or only the first route of your VN.
  • Lys, my game sucks! Hey! Don't be hard on yourself— remember that we're here to learn and as long as you learned something, you'll be another step closer to success! Two weeks is not a lot of time to work in. Sacrifices may be necessary. Your game may not be as great as you hoped. But as long as you take something away from this experience, you've accomplished what we hope for for all jammers! 
  • And most importantly, have fun! Remember— the goal is not just to make a game, but to enjoy the process as well!

As a reminder, you can contact any of the hosts via our social media on Twitter and Tumblr as linked below. Don't hesitate to let us know if there's something we can help with!

Let's go make some games!

Official Accounts

Hosts

Lysander Twitter: @kreutzerland

J Twitter: @yurigods

Nikki Twitter: @charblar

Social

Welcome to My First Game Jam: Winter 2020! For those of you just joining us, it's been a tradition to kick things off with a little getting-to-know-you questionnaire! For the first-time game developer, things can be pretty intimidating... which is why we want to show you you're not alone! This is not a required activity— it's just meant as a way to break into the community for returning jammers and newbies alike.

We'd love for you to share your influences, passions, and jam goals with the rest of us. Who knows — you might meet a potential team member, or even a new friend!

(These questions are entirely optional; they're just here to warm things up, so feel free to skip them as needed!)

Onto the questions!

1. Hi there! What's your name? Want to introduce yourself?

2. Did you participate in the last jam we held? If so, what do you plan on doing better this time? If not, what's your reason for joining?

3. What games are your favorites? Did any of them inspire you, or made you want to make your own?

4. Do you have experience with game development? What did you do/with what engine?

5. Tell us about something you're passionate about!

6. What are your goals for this game jam?

For returning jammers:

7. Any advice to new participants?

8. What can the admins do to improve your jam experience?

9. What are some of the past works you've made for the jam? Show off your favorites!

10. Bonus: Got any question suggestions? Let us know for next year!

(1 edit)

Hello everyone! Thank you for joining us for another session of My First Game Jam! As with every jam before it, it's time for the post-jam wrap up and the best part— sharing your work! Now, what's next you ask?

A) Write a post-mortem!

A post-mortem is an analysis of a project's process—what was successful and what was less successful? The purpose of a post-mortem is to understand what really worked for you or your team and what broke down. Did you struggle or get stuck on one mechanic? Did your team communicate well? Did your audio person have enough resources to work with?

You can write your post-mortem as a final post to your devlog (and we encourage it for consistency!) or you can post it as a separate thread with [Post-mortem] as a tag in the title.

Check out these post-mortems on Gamasutra for some inspiration (and maybe see if you can find your favorite titles!) Don't feel that you have to match the tone of these articles, though. Your post-mortem for the jam can be as formal or as informal as you'd like--all you really need to document is what worked and what didn't!

B) Share your games!

Time to show off what you finished (or didn't finish!) We've provided a separate thread specifically for playtesting and sharing right over here. Please follow the instructions provided if you'd like to receive critique on your game!

C) Play some games!

Now this is the part where you get finally relax! Go check out your fellow jammers' work and don't forget to leave a comment and let them know how they're doing! The community is the lifeblood of this game jam, so we encourage you guys to reach out and leave feedback on your peers' games!

D) Let us know how we're doing!

If you have any comments, concerns, or ideas for future jams, please let us know! We rely on you guys to help us improve your jam experience so please don't hesitate to give us some feedback via our exit polls, which should be arriving in your inboxes shortly if you filled our pre-jam poll! Our ask box is always open if the FAQ doesn't cover everything!

Thanks for joining us again, and we hope to see you guys again in the winter! 

Please use this form if you'd like critique on your game!

Game Title/URL: Self-explanatory.  Link your game here. 

Pitch/Information: A short description of the game.

I'd like feedback on: You can put a list, questions, or description of what you would like critique on. Can be "anything!" if you're not looking for anything specific.

I need help on: Optional; remove if unnecessary, but if you have a specific problem or bug that you would like help or advice with solving, put it here!

Hi, thank you for giving us feedback on the jam structure. The third party form and email prompt are both optional and are not required to participate in the jam, and we only use these to gather community feedback on different aspects of the game jam or to otherwise send out information regarding jam dates and other announcements. Essentially, it's our mailing list. As stated before, these are both entirely optional and have no bearing on your ability to participate in the game jam, and you're free to opt out at any time if you feel that it is an invasion of your privacy.

As for the reporting, every year we get a number of games that were not created for or during MFGJ, and due to the nature of the game jam we believe it is unfair to those who participate in the jam exclusively. These games we typically remove from the submission feed, but in the case of someone repeatedly adding the same game despite our warnings, we do end up reporting these as jams lack a block feature for games. We understand that your concern over exposure is well-placed and valid, but MFGJ isn't the place to submit a past project for exposure, because the ultimate goal is for the jammer to gain experience and try something new. Submitting a project you already created does not constitute as this.

Furthermore, as I mentioned, the forms we use help us course correct and provide insight on how to run the jam better. The exit form is specifically meant for concerns like this, and in the future if you have any other comments, we'd appreciate it if you reached us through there. This thread will be locked for this reason. 

Welcome to My First Game Jam: Summer 2019! For those of you just joining us, it's been a tradition to kick things off with a little getting-to-know-you questionnaire! For the first-time game developer, things can be pretty intimidating... which is why we want to show you you're not alone! This is not a required activity— it's just meant as a way to break into the community for returning jammers and newbies alike.

We'd love for you to share your influences, passions, and jam goals with the rest of us. Who knows — you might meet a potential team member, or even a new friend!

(These questions are entirely optional; they're just here to warm things up, so feel free to skip them as needed!)

Onto the questions!

1. Hi there! What's your name? Want to introduce yourself?

2. Did you participate in the last jam we held? If so, what do you plan on doing better this time? If not, what's your reason for joining?

3. What games are your favorites? Did any of them inspire you, or made you want to make your own?

4. Do you have experience with game development? What did you do/with what engine?

5. Tell us about something you're passionate about!

6. What are your goals for this game jam?

For returning jammers:

7. Any advice to new participants?

8. What can the admins do to improve your jam experience?

9. What are some of the past works you've made for the jam? Show off your favorites!

(1 edit)

Getting Started

Hello everyone and welcome to our Summer 2019 edition of My First Game Jam! For the uninitiated, this game jam is designed for beginner game developers to try their hand at making something new, or for experienced developers to practice new skills and experiment. If you'd like to take a look at past jams, check out this link!

Here's a few tips and links to help you get the most out of the jam. If we didn't cover something in this guide, try our FAQ or message us on tumblr or twitter.  Additionally,  familiarize yourself with our community's Code of Conduct. Remember, this jam is meant to be a safe space for everyone. 

We highly suggest you go over this post thoroughly.

Check out our resources!

We've compiled tons and tons of lists and threads for you guys in order to help you out on your jam journey.

Wondering what engine to use? We've got a post for that.  Still stuck on your concept? Try some of these idea generators.  Completely clueless as to where to start? Try this thread. Need a team for the jam? Check the teamfinding channel on our Discord. Looking for gamedev resources? We got you covered.  Looking for free assets? Guess what— we've got a list for that too.

Still need some help? Shoot us a question and we'll see what we can do.

Make a dev log on the community!

A development blog is a blog in which a game developer or team talks about the process they've made over the course of the game's creation. Maintaining a devblog keeps your audience in the know and helps facilitate productivity so you'll have something to blog about. It also serves as a record of problems you encounter as well as the solutions you find for those problems.

Development logs are essentially the same thing, except we'll be using the jam forums rather than a blog. However, you are free to use both the forums and your own blog as you develop your game.

Doing so is not necessary at all, but check out all the logs from our first jamIn order to get the most out of your jam experience, it is vital that you interact with your fellow jammers and the community surrounding it. They'll provide valuable feedback and support to help you along the way. So please, we encourage you to mingle, post in other logs, and of course post your own!

In addition, you are encouraged to add images and gifs. Here's some programs to help facilitate that:

Post daily updates!

Post screenshots or fun mishaps to your dev log, twitter, tumblr, or your own blog to track your progress and get feedback. Tag your posts as #MyFirstGameJam so other jammers can find your work! To get the most exposure you can also tag #gamedev or #ScreenshotSaturday for Saturdays! Share your work and link back to your devlog to get feedback.

Manage your time and tasks!

We compiled a list here of useful time and task management tools. Set goals early and keep track of how fast it takes you to reach them!

Join the jam chat!

You can go to the discord chat here! Not only is it a great place to interact with other jammers, but it's also a great place to get instant advice, help, and feedback on your progress. You can also get in touch with your jam hosts this way if you have any questions, or are looking for a team.

Be nice!

No one likes being told their game sucks. That's just how it is. And while it's true that in the real world one must face harsh criticize, here at My First Game Jam we aim to create a constructive atmosphere and encourage rather than discourage. Don't be a jerk, and don't give unsolicited critique unless you've been asked to. Always remember to highlight strong points as well as weak points. And, please remember, no one here is trying to put you down. Before you react, ask for clarification. Chances are that no one meant any harm.

Aaaand good luck!

Gamedev can be exciting, frustrating, and extremely rewarding. We hope to give you the tools to help you succeed in your goals in the next two weeks! Remember, if you have any questions please feel free to contact one of your jam hosts. You can message one of us in the discord chat, post on our FAQ thread, or tweet/send an ask to our Twitter or Tumblr.

Some last minute tips:

  • Don't overestimate your skills. Gamedev is a hard and often rocky road and is the culmination of skills that often take years to master. You're going to find yourself getting frustrated, so it's okay to scale back your game.
  • Communicate with your team. It's unwise to let salt build up and be passive-aggressive— this will only take away from your work. Be honest, be clear, and be understanding.
  • 2 weeks isn't enough time to make your magnum opus. You'll set yourself up for disappointment that way. Instead, try to set realistic goals for yourself for your schedule and your allotted work time.
  • Interact with other developers! This will vastly improve your game jam experience, and you'll get to share content, meet new people, and hopefully make friends along the way!
  • Google is your friend.  I don't think this can be stressed  enough. A lot of programming and coding is... essentially knowing how to google things. Don't be afraid to google the shit out of your questions, because it's extremely likely that someone's had the same issue as you at some point.
  • Check out game engine forums. Usually these come attached to the sites you download the engine from, and they're usually stuffed full of information on how to use your engine of choice. We've linked a few resources on our resource list, but this will save you (and us) a lot of time.
  • Remember to take breaks and hydrate! You're gonna be sitting at your PC for hours at a time— so don't forget to stretch your legs every so often.
  • Can't finish your game? Submit it anyway! Be proud of whatever you did, even if you only got through one stage of your platformer or only the first route of your VN.
  • Lys, my game sucks! Hey! Don't be hard on yourself— remember that we're here to learn and as long as you learned something, you'll be another step closer to success! Two weeks is not a lot of time to work in. Sacrifices may be necessary. Your game may not be as great as you hoped. But as long as you take something away from this experience, you've accomplished what we hope for for all jammers! 
  • And most importantly, have fun! Remember— the goal is not just to make a game, but to enjoy the process as well!

As a reminder, you can contact any of the hosts via our social media on Twitter and Tumblr as linked below. Don't hesitate to let us know if there's something we can help with!

Let's go make some games!

Official Accounts

Hosts

Lysander Twitter: @kreutzerland

J Twitter: @yurigods

Nikki Twitter: @charblar

Social

Hello everyone! Thank you for joining us for another session of My First Game Jam! As with every jam before it, it's time for the post-jam wrap up and the best part— sharing your work! Now, what's next you ask?

A) Write a post-mortem!

A post-mortem is an analysis of a project's process—what was successful and what was less successful? The purpose of a post-mortem is to understand what really worked for you or your team and what broke down. Did you struggle or get stuck on one mechanic? Did your team communicate well? Did your audio person have enough resources to work with?

You can write your post-mortem as a final post to your devlog (and we encourage it for consistency!) or you can post it as a separate thread with [Post-mortem] as a tag in the title.

Check out these post-mortems on Gamasutra for some inspiration (and maybe see if you can find your favorite titles!) Don't feel that you have to match the tone of these articles, though. Your post-mortem for the jam can be as formal or as informal as you'd like--all you really need to document is what worked and what didn't!

B) Share your games!

Time to show off what you finished (or didn't finish!) We've provided a separate thread specifically for playtesting and sharing right over here. Please follow the instructions provided if you'd like to receive critique on your game!

C) Play some games!

Now this is the part where you get finally relax! Go check out your fellow jammers' work and don't forget to leave a comment and let them know how they're doing! The community is the lifeblood of this game jam, so we encourage you guys to reach out and leave feedback on your peers' games!

D) Let us know how we're doing!

If you have any comments, concerns, or ideas for future jams, please let us know! We rely on you guys to help us improve your jam experience so please don't hesitate to give us some feedback via our exit polls, which should be arriving in your inboxes shortly if you filled our pre-jam poll! Our ask box is always open if the FAQ doesn't cover everything!

Thanks for joining us again, and we hope to see you guys again in the winter! 

Please use this form if you'd like critique on your game!

Game Title/URL: Self-explanatory.  Link your game here. 

Pitch/Information: A short description of the game.

I'd like feedback on: You can put a list, questions, or description of what you would like critique on. Can be "anything!" if you're not looking for anything specific.

I need help on: Optional; remove if unnecessary, but if you have a specific problem or bug that you would like help or advice with solving, put it here!

> is this based on the fact that i am currently pumping claritin into my flesh vessel every 24 hours on the dot? who's to say. 


i feel this viscerally

EXCITED TO SEE WHAT BECOMES OF THIS CONCEPT, IT SOUNDS VERY CUTE!!!

I AM EXTREMELY EXCITED ABOUT THIS

OHHH i love this concept and the art so far! really excited to see the progress on this !!!

Getting Started

Hello everyone and welcome to our Winter 2018 edition of My First Game Jam! For the uninitiated, this game jam is designed for beginner game developers to try their hand at making something new, or for experienced developers to practice new skills and experiment. If you'd like to take a look at past jams, check out this link!

Here's a few tips and links to help you get the most out of the jam. If we didn't cover something in this guide, try our FAQ or message us on tumblr or twitter.  Additionally,  familiarize yourself with our community's Code of Conduct. Remember, this jam is meant to be a safe space for everyone. 

We highly suggest you go over this post thoroughly.

Check out our resources!

We've compiled tons and tons of lists and threads for you guys in order to help you out on your jam journey.

Wondering what engine to use? We've got a post for that.  Still stuck on your concept? Try some of these idea generators.  Completely clueless as to where to start? Try this thread. Need a team for the jam? Check the teamfinding channel on our Discord. Looking for gamedev resources? We got you covered.  Looking for free assets? Guess what— we've got a list for that too.

Still need some help? Shoot us a question and we'll see what we can do.

Make a dev log on the community!

A development blog is a blog in which a game developer or team talks about the process they've made over the course of the game's creation. Maintaining a devblog keeps your audience in the know and helps facilitate productivity so you'll have something to blog about. It also serves as a record of problems you encounter as well as the solutions you find for those problems.

Development logs are essentially the same thing, except we'll be using the jam forums rather than a blog. However, you are free to use both the forums and your own blog as you develop your game.

Doing so is not necessary at all, but check out all the logs from our first jamIn order to get the most out of your jam experience, it is vital that you interact with your fellow jammers and the community surrounding it. They'll provide valuable feedback and support to help you along the way. So please, we encourage you to mingle, post in other logs, and of course post your own!

In addition, you are encouraged to add images and gifs. Here's some programs to help facilitate that:

Post daily updates!

Post screenshots or fun mishaps to your dev log, twitter, tumblr, or your own blog to track your progress and get feedback. Tag your posts as #MyFirstGameJam so other jammers can find your work! To get the most exposure you can also tag #gamedev or #ScreenshotSaturday for Saturdays! Share your work and link back to your devlog to get feedback.

Manage your time and tasks!

We compiled a list here of useful time and task management tools. Set goals early and keep track of how fast it takes you to reach them!

Join the jam chat!

You can go to the discord chat here! Not only is it a great place to interact with other jammers, but it's also a great place to get instant advice, help, and feedback on your progress. You can also get in touch with your jam hosts this way if you have any questions, or are looking for a team.

Be nice!

No one likes being told their game sucks. That's just how it is. And while it's true that in the real world one must face harsh criticize, here at My First Game Jam we aim to create a constructive atmosphere and encourage rather than discourage. Don't be a jerk, and don't give unsolicited critique unless you've been asked to. Always remember to highlight strong points as well as weak points. And, please remember, no one here is trying to put you down. Before you react, ask for clarification. Chances are that no one meant any harm.

Aaaand good luck!

Game dev can be exciting, frustrating, and extremely rewarding. We hope to give you the tools to help you succeed in your goals in the next two weeks! Remember, if you have any questions please feel free to contact one of your jam hosts. You can message one of us in the discord chat, post on our FAQ thread, or tweet/send an ask to our twitter or tumblr.

Some last minute tips:

  • Don't overestimate your skills. Gamedev is a hard and often rocky road and is the culmination of skills that often take years to master. You're going to find yourself getting frustrated, so it's okay to scale back your game.
  • Communicate with your team. It's unwise to let salt build up and be passive-aggressive— this will only take away from your work. Be honest, be clear, and be understanding.
  • 2 weeks isn't enough time to make your magnum opus. You'll set yourself up for disappointment that way. Instead, try to set realistic goals for yourself for your schedule and your allotted work time.
  • Interact with other developers! This will vastly improve your game jam experience, and you'll get to share content, meet new people, and hopefully make friends along the way!
  • Google is your friend.  I don't think this can be stressed  enough. A lot of programming and coding is... essentially knowing how to google things. Don't be afraid to google the shit out of your questions, because it's extremely likely that someone's had the same issue as you at some point.
  • Check out game engine forums. Usually these come attached to the sites you download the engine from, and they're usually stuffed full of information on how to use your engine of choice. We've linked a few resources on our resource list, but this will save you (and us) a lot of time.
  • Remember to take breaks and hydrate! You're gonna be sitting at your PC for hours at a time— so don't forget to stretch your legs every so often.
  • Can't finish your game? Submit it anyway! Be proud of whatever you did, even if you only got through one stage of your platformer or only the first route of your VN.
  • Lys, my game sucks! Hey! Don't be hard on yourself— remember that we're here to learn and as long as you learned something, you'll be another step closer to success! Two weeks is not a lot of time to work in. Sacrifices may be necessary. Your game may not be as great as you hoped. But as long as you take something away from this experience, you've accomplished what we hope for for all jammers! 
  • And most importantly, have fun! Remember— the goal is not just to make a game, but to enjoy the process as well!

As a reminder, you can contact any of the hosts via our social media on twitter and tumblr as linked below. Don't hesitate to let us know if there's something we can help with!

Let's go make some games!

Official Accounts

Hosts

Lysander Twitter: @kreutzerland

J Twitter: @yurigods

Nikki Twitter: @charblar

Social

Welcome to My First Game Jam: Winter 2019! For those of you just joining us, it's been a tradition to kick things off with a little getting-to-know-you questionnaire! For the first-time game developer, things can be pretty intimidating... which is why we want to show you you're not alone! This is not a required activity— it's just meant as a way to break into the community for returning jammers and newbies alike.

We'd love for you to share your influences, passions, and jam goals with the rest of us. Who knows — you might meet a potential team member, or even a new friend!

(These questions are entirely optional; they're just here to warm things up, so feel free to skip them as needed!)

Onto the questions!

1. Hi there! What's your name? Want to introduce yourself?

2. Did you participate in the last jam we held? If so, what do you plan on doing better this time? If not, what's your reason for joining?

3. What games are your favorites? Did any of them inspire you, or made you want to make your own?

4. Do you have experience with game development? What did you do/with what engine?

5. Tell us about something you're passionate about!

6. What are your goals for this game jam?

For returning jammers:

7. Any advice to new participants?

8. What can the admins do to improve your jam experience?

9. What are some of the past works you've made for the jam? Show off your favorites!


(1 edit)

Hello everyone! Thank you for joining us for another session of My First Game Jam! As with every jam before it, it's time for the post-jam wrap up and the best part— sharing your work! Now, what's next you ask?

A) Write a post-mortem!

A post-mortem is an analysis of a project's process—what was successful and what was less successful? The purpose of a post-mortem is to understand what really worked for you or your team and what broke down. Did you struggle or get stuck on one mechanic? Did your team communicate well? Did your audio person have enough resources to work with?

You can write your post-mortem as a final post to your devlog (and we encourage it for consistency!) or you can post it as a separate thread with [Post-mortem] as a tag in the title.

Check out these post-mortems on Gamasutra for some inspiration (and maybe see if you can find your favorite titles!) Don't feel that you have to match the tone of these articles, though. Your post-mortem for the jam can be as formal or as informal as you'd like--all you really need to document is what worked and what didn't!

B) Share your games!

Time to show off what you finished (or didn't finish!) We've provided a separate thread specifically for playtesting and sharing right over here. Please follow the instructions provided if you'd like to receive critique on your game!

C) Play some games!

Now this is the part where you get finally relax! Go check out your fellow jammers' work and don't forget to leave a comment and let them know how they're doing! The community is the lifeblood of this game jam, so we encourage you guys to reach out and leave feedback on your peers' games!

D) Let us know how we're doing!

If you have any comments, concerns, or ideas for future jams, please let us know! We rely on you guys to help us improve your jam experience so please don't hesitate to give us some feedback via our exit polls, which should be arriving in your inboxes shortly if you filled our pre-jam poll! Our ask box is always open if the FAQ doesn't cover everything!

Thanks for joining us again, and we hope to see you guys again in the winter! 

Please use this form if you'd like critique on your game!

Game Title/URL: Self-explanatory.  Link your game here. 

Pitch/Information: A short description of the game.

I'd like feedback on: You can put a list, questions, or description of what you would like critique on. Can be "anything!" if you're not looking for anything specific.

I need help on: Optional; remove if unnecessary, but if you have a specific problem or bug that you would like help or advice with solving, put it here!

Hi everyone! Having a good jam so far? We thought it might be a neat idea to encourage a playtesting weekend, meant to help everyone pinpoint issues and check out other jammers' work! It's okay if you don't have your game done— you can still show us what you have so far! To account for the lateness of this announcement, the dates for posting your games will be between Saturday through Monday. Doing this is optional, but we encourage you to post! We also HIGHLY encourage you to check out games with no feedback; let your fellow jammers know you're cheering them on!

If you'd like to participate, please post here with the following information:

Game Title/URL: Self-explanatory.  Link your game here. 

Pitch/Information: A short description of the game.

I'd like feedback on: You can put a list, questions, or description of what you would like critique on. Can be "anything!" if you're not looking for anything specific.

I need help on: Optional so remove if unnecessary, but if you have a specific problem or bug that you would like help or advice with solving, put it here!


Have fun, and don't forget to play eachother's games!

Welcome to My First Game Jam: Winter 2018! For those of you just joining us, it's been a tradition to kick things off with a little getting-to-know-you questionnaire! For the first-time game developer, things can be pretty intimidating... which is why we want to show you you're not alone! This is not a required activity— it's just meant as a way to break into the community for returning jammers and newbies alike.

We'd love for you to share your influences, passions, and jam goals with the rest of us. Who knows — you might meet a potential team member, or even a new friend!

Onto the questions!

1. Hi there! What's your name? Want to introduce yourself?

2. Did you participate in the last jam we held? If so, what do you plan on doing better this time? If not, what's your reason for joining?

3. What games are your favorites? Did any of them inspire you, or made you want to make your own?

4. Do you have experience with game development? What did you do/with what engine?

5. Tell us about something you're passionate about!

6. What are your goals for this game jam?

7. Any advice to new jammers (if you're a veteran)?

8. If you're a returning jammer, what can the admins do to improve your jam experience?

Getting Started

Hello everyone and welcome to our Winter 2018 edition of My First Game Jam! For the uninitiated, this game jam is designed for beginner game developers to try their hand at making something new, or for experienced developers to practice new skills and experiment. If you'd like to take a look at past jams, check out this link!

Here's a few tips and links to help you get the most out of the jam. If we didn't cover something in this guide, try our FAQ or message us on tumblr or twitter.  Additionally,  familiarize yourself with our community's Code of Conduct. Remember, this jam is meant to be a safe space for everyone. 

We highly suggest you go over this post thoroughly.

Check out our resources!

We've compiled tons and tons of lists and threads for you guys in order to help you out on your jam journey.

Wondering what engine to use? We've got a post for that.  Still stuck on your concept? Try some of these idea generators.  Completely clueless as to where to start? Try this thread. Need a team for the jam? Check the teamfinding channel on our Discord. Looking for gamedev resources? We got you covered.  Looking for free assets? Guess what— we've got a list for that too.

Still need some help? Shoot us a question and we'll see what we can do.

Make a dev log on the community!

A development blog is a blog in which a game developer or team talks about the process they've made over the course of the game's creation. Maintaining a devblog keeps your audience in the know and helps facilitate productivity so you'll have something to blog about. It also serves as a record of problems you encounter as well as the solutions you find for those problems.

Development logs are essentially the same thing, except we'll be using the jam forums rather than a blog. However, you are free to use both the forums and your own blog as you develop your game.

Doing so is not necessary at all, but check out all the logs from our first jamIn order to get the most out of your jam experience, it is vital that you interact with your fellow jammers and the community surrounding it. They'll provide valuable feedback and support to help you along the way. So please, we encourage you to mingle, post in other logs, and of course post your own!

In addition, you are encouraged to add images and gifs. Here's some programs to help facilitate that:

Post daily updates!

Post screenshots or fun mishaps to your dev log, twitter, tumblr, or your own blog to track your progress and get feedback. Tag your posts as #MyFirstGameJam so other jammers can find your work! To get the most exposure you can also tag #gamedev or #ScreenshotSaturday for Saturdays! Share your work and link back to your devlog to get feedback.

Manage your time and tasks!

We compiled a list here of useful time and task management tools. Set goals early and keep track of how fast it takes you to reach them!

Join the jam chat!

You can go to the discord chat here! Not only is it a great place to interact with other jammers, but it's also a great place to get instant advice, help, and feedback on your progress. You can also get in touch with your jam hosts this way if you have any questions, or are looking for a team.

Be nice!

No one likes being told their game sucks. That's just how it is. And while it's true that in the real world one must face harsh criticize, here at My First Game Jam we aim to create a constructive atmosphere and encourage rather than discourage. Don't be a jerk, and don't give unsolicited critique unless you've been asked to. Always remember to highlight strong points as well as weak points. And, please remember, no one here is trying to put you down. Before you react, ask for clarification. Chances are that no one meant any harm.

Aaaand good luck!

Game dev can be exciting, frustrating, and extremely rewarding. We hope to give you the tools to help you succeed in your goals in the next two weeks! Remember, if you have any questions please feel free to contact one of your jam hosts. You can message one of us in the discord chat, post on our FAQ thread, or tweet/send an ask to our twitter or tumblr.

Some last minute tips:

  • Don't overestimate your skills. Gamedev is a hard and often rocky road and is the culmination of skills that often take years to master. You're going to find yourself getting frustrated, so it's okay to scale back your game.
  • Communicate with your team. It's unwise to let salt build up and be passive-aggressive— this will only take away from your work. Be honest, be clear, and be understanding.
  • 2 weeks isn't enough time to make your magnum opus. You'll set yourself up for disappointment that way. Instead, try to set realistic goals for yourself for your schedule and your allotted work time.
  • Interact with other developers! This will vastly improve your game jam experience, and you'll get to share content, meet new people, and hopefully make friends along the way!
  • Google is your friend.  I don't think this can be stressed  enough. A lot of programming and coding is... essentially knowing how to google things. Don't be afraid to google the shit out of your questions, because it's extremely likely that someone's had the same issue as you at some point.
  • Check out game engine forums. Usually these come attached to the sites you download the engine from, and they're usually stuffed full of information on how to use your engine of choice. We've linked a few resources on our resource list, but this will save you (and us) a lot of time.
  • Remember to take breaks and hydrate! You're gonna be sitting at your PC for hours at a time— so don't forget to stretch your legs every so often.
  • Can't finish your game? Submit it anyway! Be proud of whatever you did, even if you only got through one stage of your platformer or only the first route of your VN.
  • Lys, my game sucks! Hey! Don't be hard on yourself— remember that we're here to learn and as long as you learned something, you'll be another step closer to success! Two weeks is not a lot of time to work in. Sacrifices may be necessary. Your game may not be as great as you hoped. But as long as you take something away from this experience, you've accomplished what we hope for for all jammers! 
  • And most importantly, have fun! Remember— the goal is not just to make a game, but to enjoy the process as well!

As a reminder, you can contact any of the hosts via our social media on twitter and tumblr as linked below. Don't hesitate to let us know if there's something we can help with!

Let's go make some games!

Official Accounts

Hosts

Lysander Twitter: @kreutzerland

J Twitter: @yurigods

Nikki Twitter: @charblar

Social

Encourage participants to comment on each other's devlogs more. The amount of attention a given game received was highly variable, even if it ended up with a finished demo, and it could feel isolating.

yeah, i agree this has been a reoccurring issue, probably due to the sheer volume of games we usually get- like usually 80-100+... we'll try pushing the comment-for-comment model, but it's hard to enforce as it's mainly just an honor system. do you have any suggestions for what we could do?

Also, stress constructive feedback and what that means; the only comment I got on my demo itself was half backhanded compliment and half arbitrary complaint, couched in polite language, and none of it was actionable. (So I deleted it.)

oof, i'm sorry that happened to you. unfortunately we can only really do something about it if it's a fellow jammer who made the comment— obviously strangers are outside our jurisdiction, but let us know if something like this happens again. i'll suggest a warning system for non-constructive crit.

Getting Started

Hello everyone and welcome to our Winter 2018 edition of My First Game Jam! For the uninitiated, this game jam is designed for beginner game developers to try their hand at making something new, or for experienced developers to practice new skills and experiment. If you'd like to take a look at past jams, check out this link!

Here's a few tips and links to help you get the most out of the jam. If we didn't cover something in this guide, try our FAQ or message us on tumblr or twitter.  Additionally,  familiarize yourself with our community's Code of Conduct. Remember, this jam is meant to be a safe space for everyone. 

We highly suggest you go over this post thoroughly.

Check out our resources!

We've compiled tons and tons of lists and threads for you guys in order to help you out on your jam journey.

Wondering what engine to use? We've got a post for that.  Still stuck on your concept? Try some of these idea generators.  Completely clueless as to where to start? Try this thread. Need a team for the jam? Check the teamfinding channel on our Discord. Looking for gamedev resources? We got you covered.  Looking for free assets? Guess what— we've got a list for that too.

Still need some help? Shoot us a question and we'll see what we can do.

Make a dev log on the community!

A development blog is a blog in which a game developer or team talks about the process they've made over the course of the game's creation. Maintaining a devblog keeps your audience in the know and helps facilitate productivity so you'll have something to blog about. It also serves as a record of problems you encounter as well as the solutions you find for those problems.

Development logs are essentially the same thing, except we'll be using the jam forums rather than a blog. However, you are free to use both the forums and your own blog as you develop your game.

Doing so is not necessary at all, but check out all the logs from our first jamIn order to get the most out of your jam experience, it is vital that you interact with your fellow jammers and the community surrounding it. They'll provide valuable feedback and support to help you along the way. So please, we encourage you to mingle, post in other logs, and of course post your own!

In addition, you are encouraged to add images and gifs. Here's some programs to help facilitate that:

Post daily updates!

Post screenshots or fun mishaps to your dev log, twitter, tumblr, or your own blog to track your progress and get feedback. Tag your posts as #MyFirstGameJam so other jammers can find your work! To get the most exposure you can also tag #gamedev or #ScreenshotSaturday for Saturdays! Share your work and link back to your devlog to get feedback.

Manage your time and tasks!

We compiled a list here of useful time and task management tools. Set goals early and keep track of how fast it takes you to reach them!

Join the jam chat!

You can go to the discord chat here! Not only is it a great place to interact with other jammers, but it's also a great place to get instant advice, help, and feedback on your progress. You can also get in touch with your jam hosts this way if you have any questions, or are looking for a team.

Be nice!

No one likes being told their game sucks. That's just how it is. And while it's true that in the real world one must face harsh criticize, here at My First Game Jam we aim to create a constructive atmosphere and encourage rather than discourage. Don't be a jerk, and don't give unsolicited critique unless you've been asked to. Always remember to highlight strong points as well as weak points. And, please remember, no one here is trying to put you down. Before you react, ask for clarification. Chances are that no one meant any harm.

Aaaand good luck!

Game dev can be exciting, frustrating, and extremely rewarding. We hope to give you the tools to help you succeed in your goals in the next two weeks! Remember, if you have any questions please feel free to contact one of your jam hosts. You can message one of us in the discord chat, post on our FAQ thread, or tweet/send an ask to our twitter or tumblr.

Some last minute tips:

  • Don't overestimate your skills. Gamedev is a hard and often rocky road and is the culmination of skills that often take years to master. You're going to find yourself getting frustrated, so it's okay to scale back your game.
  • Communicate with your team. It's unwise to let salt build up and be passive-aggressive— this will only take away from your work. Be honest, be clear, and be understanding.
  • 2 weeks isn't enough time to make your magnum opus. You'll set yourself up for disappointment that way. Instead, try to set realistic goals for yourself for your schedule and your allotted work time.
  • Interact with other developers! This will vastly improve your game jam experience, and you'll get to share content, meet new people, and hopefully make friends along the way!
  • Google is your friendI don't think this can be stressed  enough. A lot of programming and coding is... essentially knowing how to google things. Don't be afraid to google the shit out of your questions, because it's extremely likely that someone's had the same issue as you at some point.
  • Check out game engine forums. Usually these come attached to the sites you download the engine from, and they're usually stuffed full of information on how to use your engine of choice. We've linked a few resources on our resource list, but this will save you (and us) a lot of time.
  • Remember to take breaks and hydrate! You're gonna be sitting at your PC for hours at a time— so don't forget to stretch your legs every so often.
  • Can't finish your game? Submit it anyway! Be proud of whatever you did, even if you only got through one stage of your platformer or only the first route of your VN.
  • Lys, my game sucks! Hey! Don't be hard on yourself— remember that we're here to learn and as long as you learned something, you'll be another step closer to success! Two weeks is not a lot of time to work in. Sacrifices may be necessary. Your game may not be as great as you hoped. But as long as you take something away from this experience, you've accomplished what we hope for for all jammers! 
  • And most importantly, have fun! Remember— the goal is not just to make a game, but to enjoy the process as well!

As a reminder, you can contact any of the hosts via our social media on twitter and tumblr as linked below. Don't hesitate to let us know if there's something we can help with!

Let's go make some games!

Official Accounts

Hosts

Lysander Twitter: @kreutzerland

J Twitter: @yurigods

Nikki Twitter: @charblar

Social

Welcome to My First Game Jam: Winter 2018! For those of you just joining us, it's been a tradition to kick things off with a little getting-to-know-you questionnaire! For the first-time game developer, things can be pretty intimidating... which is why we want to show you you're not alone! This is not a required activity— it's just meant as a way to break into the community for returning jammers and newbies alike.

We'd love for you to share your influences, passions, and jam goals with the rest of us. Who knows — you might meet a potential team member, or even a new friend!

Onto the questions!

1. Hi there! What's your name? Want to introduce yourself?

2. Did you participate in the last jam we held? If so, what do you plan on doing better this time? If not, what's your reason for joining?

3. What games are your favorites? Did any of them inspire you, or made you want to make your own?

4. Do you have experience with game development? What did you do/with what engine?

5. Tell us about something you're passionate about!

6. What are your goals for this game jam?

7. Any advice to new jammers (if you're a veteran)?

8. If you're a returning jammer, what can the admins do to improve your jam experience?

does this help you out?

ooh, I haven't heard of this engine! you're making me interested in trying it out! also nice work so far, keep it up!

twine games need to be in a zip in order to work iirc. it might be different in twine 2 but in the previous version, you needed to stick the index.html into a zip and upload that. 

did you also check the "make this playable in the browser" box? can you tell us what exactly you tried doing?

hey!! i love this concept you've got going here! i can't wait to see more! psychological themes are always fun! >:3c

hey! thanks for joining! looks like you've got the logic figured out, so good luck with the rest of the jam! interesting concept you have so far. O:

welcome to the jam! it's cool to see more non-americans in here, since most of our userbase is based in the US. i totally relate to that last statement — i can only get things done on a deadline. hopefully this will work for you too! good luck!

hotline miami is so aesthetic. i'm excited to see what you end up doing ( will it be 80s inspired? O:) good luck!

oh man, i'd love to see some of those vg music covers. music is probably one of my biggest passions and vg music is responsible for some of the most memorable moments i remember from games. good luck with the jam!

thanks for joining the jam! i also started dabbling a little in music thanks to vg music — particularly cavestory. moonsong is the song that started it all for me. good luck with your game and nice pointers you've got there! an overzealous scope is probably the biggest issue most people run into.

hey devone! nice to see you in the jam and thank you for your service! this game jam is a great way to meet other like-minded people and network, so i hope that aspect of the jam pans out for you!