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I don't remember what the exact text of the event is, I just described what it does.  The text was something like "Fewer beesitters are being born for some reason."  So I cranked up the number of beesitters to compensate.  Then all the bees died at once. 

The player experience was indistinguishable from "Beesitters randomly stop working for no reason" because all the nurseries suddenly sat empty.  Adjusting the sliders did nothing.  The game just decided it was time for my colony to die.  I feel like I did everything I could and it was ineffective. 

I'm sure this is by design, but I don't understand why you chose to design it that way.  I was trying to beef up my numbers so I could start working on Honey, when suddenly the game decided to kill my colony.

Do you get what I'm saying?  I had a ton of nurseries and a ton of beesitters, and the game suddenly announced the event and killed my colony.

I get the impression the description of the beesitter-killer event was deliberately vague about the cause because it's not designed to have any counter-play.  If this is not your intended design, please explain how a hive with 30 beesitters could avoid this event or account for it after it pops up.  What was the player expected to do differently in this situation? 

I needed more nectar so I built more nurseries because bees provide nectar.  There's literally no other way to get more nectar that I know of, other than by building more nurseries.

This is not an email, which is what I requested, and it is not really focused on details. I'm sorry to hear that you're not enjoying the game, and while I am generally interested in hearing about players' experiences, I'm not able to offer assistance to anybody who refuses to follow instructions.

There is no event that behaves as described. My best guess is that it's referring to a warning notification that is intended to help players identify that there's a potential population issue when the cause has been overlooked.

In case anybody reading gets the wrong idea, significant population declines are not the failure-state this player presents them as. When Beesitter populations are at zero, bee spawn rates return to what they were at the beginning of the game before any Beesitters had spawned. Learning how to recover from these situations and how to prevent them is a part of the game. Some people enjoy this, but it's OK to not. Keep playing if you're having fun. Stop playing if you're not.