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electricshrock

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A member registered Apr 18, 2017

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With this demo you have succeeded in all three of the most important ways:

Great concept - a game mechanic that, while not without precedent, has never been this well executed in an FPS, to my knowledge.

Great mechanics - the physics manipulation makes for good puzzles, the controls work and it actually makes sense!

Great game world - it's got a dystopian, 1984 meets Portal thing going on,, which works well. You quickly learn all you need to know about the world and the character's place in it, but are also given the opportunity to learn more through information you are left to find yourself, which I appreciate.

Of course the graphics, level design and enemy behavior could be  elaborated on a bit,  but as a lean, efficient proof of concept this is flawless.

I'm tipping you 20 bucks because I want to see a full game!

Edit: Well, I WANT to tip you 20 bucks but there's no means available on the game page. Show me a secure method of payment and I gladly will.

At the 24th or 25th random light change or bit of audio static, I was done.  You really think there aren't enough indie games like this already?

I liked this game overall. It's a good fusion of exploration and resource management, with a cool pixel art theme. 

I don't believe I encountered any bugs per se. All looks well from that perspective.

But I did have the following considerations for gameplay:

- I have a problem with the pricing mechanism - of things getting uniformly more expensive the further you go. It can make the first playthrough difficult if you don't anticipate that this is going to happen. But once you do know to anticipate this,  it makes the game too easy - just buy up big and gather as many materials as you can early and sell off later. It would be much more interesting and challenging for prices to fluctuate at each stop (some things going up, some down, based on resource availability). So  the player is forced to make detailed, long-term resource management plans based on what the best deals will be at each stop.

- Losing 8 days for random, arbitrary events is irritating. This is too great a penalty without some skill component being involved. This is where the reaction mini-game (or similar) should come into play - not for ship repairs, which just seems daft.

- You need to refer back to the nav chart when presenting the player with the option of using a wormhole. It isn't clear from the description exactly how far ahead you can get. Same goes for the space-time rips, where the ambiguous term 'shortcut' is used. You should really specify that it's only a shortcut to your next stop, because in most cases the resulting damage to the ship isn't worth it.

- On the subject of navigation, you really need to decide whether the stop sequence should be predetermined or not. At the moment, it has the appearance of being non-linear, but in fact it isn't. Even though you have the ability to select a destination that is more than one stop away, you are not permitted to set course,  even if you have adequate resources to make the distance.. Rather you are told it is 'out of hyperspace range' without any indication of exactly what this range is.  And even though you could potentially go backwards, the time loss would mean almost certain defeat and would make no sense. If the player must advance one stop at a time in predetermined sequence, that is perfectly fine, but don't give them the false impression they can do otherwise.

- I think you need to change the way an unsuccessful delivery ends. Because the most obvious consideration is, if you're only going to lose money for a late delivery, then why make it? Any logical person would say 'fuck this' and sell the cargo somewhere else.

But all up, a good effort, and I encourage you to see it through.

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Dear devs,

First of all congratulations on your original game concept. This 'prisoners in sadistic game show' theme has been done in movies a few times, but not games, to my knowledge, so kudos for being first.

One thing I really like about the way you have done this is that you treat each episode of the program as a different mini-game, which keeps things fresh. The controls and the means of executing the different tasks is mostly pretty intuitive, although I don't understand the purpose of the email one (either within the program or within the game's narrative).

You have put a lot of emphasis on the voice acting here, and it really pays off. In fact, it is the very convincing performances of the voice actors that really makes the experience emotionally compelling.

Even though many players will probably see it coming, I really like the way the twist was executed. It felt like a homage to the Bioshock 'would you kindly?' scene.

There are some limitations with this game I probably don't need to point out, and which were probably due to its prototype nature (lack of real guards, spartan studio environment etc), but here's  a few that might be less obvious:

1) In the cake-making episode, you put a mixing bowl in the oven (which is strange enough) but you take out a tray.

2) The password entry on the laptop has a big problem if you enter anything other than the correct password . Specifically, entering any word with the letter 'e' (the most common letter in the english language!) causes you to exit and stand up again.

3) Without giving away any spoilers to other potential players, having the same voice actor play two different roles gives away the twist much, much too early. (Maybe at least disguise one of them a bit) 

4) What's more, having one of those two characters try to disuade the protagonist from attempting to escape, or suggesting that they're being tricked, doesn't make sense, in light of what is eventually revealed.

5) The language the presenter uses in addressing the protagonist and the audience is inconsistent, in terms of attempting to disguise the true nature of the program one minute and being open about it the next. (eg. Reference to 'disposing' of a contestant they previously alluded to merely 'sending home')

6) When the protagonist must make his 'big decision' the things he must decide between aren't labelled, so you don't really know what decision you're making.

7) At a few points in the studio corridoors, it is possible to walk through the walls (either that or into some kind of closet) and you can't see your way back to the lit area.

But apart from all that, I thought this was a great idea that was generally well executed. I encourage you to see it through.

Sorry but this really was quite random and pointless. One cute effect does not a game make.

The 64 bit version just repeats the save four or five questions over and over. I got up to 120 correct answers and quit.

Wolfenstein on an acid trip.

I'd pay 10 bucks for a game with 6 or more episodes of this size.

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36 playthrough videos of a game that takes about 20 minutes to play. Does nobody else think that's ridiculous? Seriously, after the first four or five have been made, you are contributing nothing.

Anyway this game looks amazing. The one enemy you face needs a lot of work (movement, reactions, damage) but good on you for throwing one in.

BTW I'm tipping you 10 bucks so you can continue your efforts :)

Yes, same for me. It downloads an empty zip file.

Mad modelling and rigging skills on display here, but this isn't really a game.

You need to improve your code to prevent the possibility of simultaneous attack from opposite sides. However you envision the creatures behaving, this is a game, so the point is it must always be at least possible to win.

So strange and wonderful, that the music for such a low-res game should be so beautifully arranged and played. I wonder if this whole thing isn't a ploy to get retro gamers into jazz.

I enjoyed this - especially the pixel art simulated 3D.

Here's 5 bucks for your future exploits ;)

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Amazing game. The falling asleep sequence has such a rich atmosphere, unique mechanics and really novel scares. If the demo was only that I'd be impressed.

I can see others have commented on the problems with the chase sequences... I would humbly suggest making these more about quick, calculated decisions, rather than blind luck. Say you already start out running with the monster behind you, and you have to quickly choose paths ahead of you, dodging and avoiding obstacles... maybe even creating obstacles for the monster... though I understand there's a lot more dev time involved in that. At any rate I'd take them out entirely rather than leave them the way they are. Sorry if that seems harsh but I still think it's great overall!

With all due respect this is too buggy to even suggest paying any money for it. 

Completely disagree - this game might look like a platformer, so that's what you assumed it should be. But it's actually a very interesting and original resource management game (the resource being energy). And if you actually listen to what's being said in the background noise it's pretty hilarious. Thumbs up from me!

This is the scariest monster attack I have ever experienced in a game. Really visceral.

Gotta say these are the best graphics I have ever seen... And I don't mean for an indie game, I mean ever. Mindblowing detail.

Nice little game. Simple concept, very well executed.

Outstanding game! I came here wanting to tip you some money for it, but doesn't seem to be a way.

Only one small complaint - lack of accurate control info for PC.

I think you could definitely expand this into a fully-fledged release. Well done!

Really unique style and gameplay.

But the chef fight killed it for me. Even that had some good ideas, but the randomness, lack of control and sheer number of factors working against you just made it a hugely frustrating button mashing experience.