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(+5)

I'm just gonna link a bunch of places to check out if you want to deep dive into the OSR wormhole:

http://questingblog.com/resources/
https://dungeonspossums.blogspot.com/2019/02/how-to-get-started-playing-old-scho...
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvYwePdbWSEwUa-Pk02u3Zw/videos

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1rN5w4-azTq3Kbn0Yvk9nfqQhwQ1R5by1/view

(+3)

GLEE 

(+1)

Dungeons & Possums's blog post is great if you specifically want to get into D&D retroclones, and the adventure recommendations & GMing advice is pretty well curated from what I can tell.

However it doesn't suggest any non-D&D rulesets that are generally considered OSR. Some suggestions:

  • Maze Rats, a simple 2d6+stat game, the majority of the game and its world is implicit in random tables.
  • Troika!, a game loosely based on the mechanics for Fighting Fantasy gamebooks, with a wild planescape-by-way-of-80s-UK-tabletop-games setting.
  • Knave, designed as a framework for running material written for old-school D&D and its retroclones, generates similar numbers to those games with a lot fewer rules.
  • Into the Odd, a rules-light game about recovering strange magic items beneath an industrial city. Embodies the OSR assumption that combat is generally a bad idea as you *will* get hurt, by skipping any to-hit roll.

One of the things that characterises a lot of OSR material, though, is that the game ruleset takes second place to the conversation at the table and internal logic of the game world. Much like a good game of Dungeon World, a good OSR session will often go quite a long time without a die roll, just using common-sense rulings.