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lysander

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whoa i really enjoyed your prose!! i feel like you really crafted something in the space of 295 words, good job!

(Edited 3 times)

So how exactly do you make a game?

If you're a beginner game developer and have no idea where to start, this is the thread for you. Here's a list of suggested steps you can take to make sure your developing experience goes smoothly. This isn't a one-size-fits-all checklist, but rather a starting point for those of you who need a little extra guidance.

One - Your Concept

Every great game starts out as an idea. It might be as simple as "I want to make a platformer" or as complex as that heroic bildungsroman with RPG elements you've been daydreaming about for years. No matter how complicated (or not) your idea is, it's good to get your basis down before taking any other steps. If you're having trouble developing your idea, it might help to ask yourself a few questions. What point are you trying to get across? What is the goal of the game? How can you develop elements of it, such as the world, characters, mechanics, or aesthetic? Brainstorming with other people can be beneficial as well.

Two - Your Engine

Once you have your idea, think about what game engine will best help you translate your idea into a tangible product. Some engines are more specialized than others, and they also may vary in power, flexibility, and complexity. More powerful is not always better— the more powerful your engine, the more learning you will need to do in order to utilize it, so keep that in mind when you're picking an engine. Also consider looking for engines specifically designed for the type of game you want to make if you're looking for specific features. If you're a beginner with the engine you've chosen, be sure to try creating some quick projects so you get a feel for the interface.

Three - Organize

This is probably one of the most important steps besides actually making your game. It may seem inconsequential, but the benefit to organizing your ideas lies in your productivity. List all the features you want— things like mechanics (movement, for example), systems (such as inventory systems, battle systems, etc.,) major plot points, characters, special scenes, areas and maps, level ideas, items and weapons, assets (including sprites, tilesets, bgs, sfx, music)... The list goes on. The work you put into organizing your game's elements will save you time, energy, and frustration when you're trying to remember what needs to be done next— and listing your elements will give you a better idea of how much work needs to be done as well. This is especially important for teams since ideally you should be delegating workloads.

Four - Make the Thing

And here's the big one. Actually making the game. There's not really a right way to go about this, but here's some good practices most people highly recommend:

  • Use placeholder assets. Don't wait for your final assets to be finished before you start working on the core parts of your game. You need a game that works before you can make it pretty.
  • Playtest often. Very often. If you catch bugs along the way, it'll be a lot easier to deal with than realizing you screwed up 2849 lines ago.
  • Name your files in a way that makes sense. As tempting as it is to keymash all your filenames, it'll be a pain to type out a million times when you're writing code. Seems like a no-brainer, but it's important enough to bear repetition.
  • Double check your asset licenses. Especially if you intend on producing a commercial game at some point. It's a good habit to start since not all assets are created equal.

Once you're done, don't forget to play your entire game. Start to finish. Check again for any bugs you might have missed before moving onto the next step.

Five - Publishing

For a commercial developer, this step usually entails a lot of advertising and networking, but for our sake we'll keep it to distribution. This is where a lot of beginner developers run into last-minute problems. Be sure to check the guides and licenses that came with whatever version of the engine you've chose, and give yourself enough time to fix your game if something breaks in the process before the deadline. However, if you fall just short of the deadline, we'll still be able to accept your game if you contact one of the mods. Don't forget— providing builds for multiple operating systems will increase your audience.

Six - Feedback & Bugs

Once your game is finally out and done, people will begin finding issues you missed while you were making the game. Major issues should be dealt with swiftly, but smaller ones may be fixed in batches at a time to avoid putting out too many versions of your game too quickly. For jam participants, we suggest a one-for-one system for giving feedback. If another jammer tries out your game, give their game a shot if you have the chance as long as you're able to. You can also show off your game screenshots in your #myfirstgamejam tags on tumblr and twitter, or share your project in the discord chat.


Remember, this isn't a concrete guide to gamedev— you might skip, combine, or completely ignore the steps in this list, and that's okay. There's no right way to make games, and although some ways are more efficient than others, what works for you works.

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A jam favorite, back by popular demand! You know the drill— it's what it says on the can. Introduce yourself to your fellow jammers and check out some of the other people dropping by. The below questionnaire is optional, but feel free to use it!

1. Hi there! What's your name? Want to introduce yourself?

2. Did you participate in the last jam we held? If so, what do you plan on doing better this time? If not, what's your reason for joining?

3. What games are your favorites? Did any of them inspire you, or made you want to make your own?

4. Do you have experience with game development? What did you do/with what engine?

5. Tell us about something you're passionate about!

6. Any advice to new jammers (if you're a veteran)?

Team Finding

Making a game all by yourself can be a daunting task. Joining a team helps make the workload manageable and connects you with other people who share the same interests. If you're looking to team up with other people for this jam, here's the place to do it! I know there's a lot of introducing going on, but bear with me a little longer!

Post to the thread with the information below. A sample post will be provided.
Once you've found a team, edit your post to show you're no longer available.


I am a [role(s)] looking for [role(s) or team]!

1. Introduction: Include any basic information you wish for people to know. I.e., Name, timezone, pronouns, etc. Or go all out and give your entire life philosophy; it's up to you!

2. Skills: Stuff you know how to do, or kind of know how to do. You can also add things you're willing to try.

3. Programs/Languages: Engines/Programs (for any use, be it art, music, game dev, animation, etc) and markup/programming languages you are familiar with.

4. Portfolio: Not terribly necessary, but it'd be a good idea to provide examples of things you've done. Don't sweat it if you're a complete beginner!

5. Contact: Ways to keep in touch. Instant messengers, slack, emails, etc.

6. Other: Anything else you think is important. Have an idea for a game? Stick it here. Have any specific expectations from your team? Stick them here. Anything goes!




Team Tips & Tricks

  • Communication is key! If you have concerns, frustrations, stress, other commitments, it is your responsibility to inform your team so they can help resolve the issue or accommodate. Most of these tips can probably be summarized as communication.
  • Can't do your part? Tell your team. If you have real life obligations, let your team members know so they can either lessen your work load or find someone else to help out.
  • Stay focused! Working together can be fun, but make sure you get things done! This is especially tricky for teams who know eachother well; sometimes the camaraderie can be a distraction.
  • Set clear, manageable goals. This helps everyone stay on the same page and facilitates productivity.
  • Dealing with stress/illness? Putting this one here for myself since I have this issue as well. If you have a history of health problems, whether it is physical or mental, please be up front about it. No one will blame you for needing to take it easy!
  • Use productivity apps/ file sharing sites! There's a plethora of resources for effective team/file management. Google Drive, Dropbox, Slack, and Trello are just a few of them. A list will soon be added here for anyone who wants to give them a whirl.
  • Again: file sharing. Mentioned in the point above, but important enough to warrant its own point. Using a file sharing service like Dropbox enables everyone to work on the same things at the same time as well as allow real-time updates. An artist can stick assets into a shared folder, thus allowing the programmer to instantly access it. Making changes is much easier too. Highly recommend teams do this!
  • Frustrated with your group? Nothing is perfect. Even with people you get along with, you're bound to have conflict. Keep a cool head and remember: even terrible game jam experiences have value. Be willing to carry on and don't give up!
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Getting Started

Hello everyone and welcome to our Winter 2017 edition of My First Game Jam! For the uninitiated, this game jam is designed for beginner game developers to try their hand at making something new, or for experienced developers to practice new skills and experiment. If you'd like to take a look at past jams, check out our first and second jams held last year.

Here's a few tips and links to get the most out of the jam. If we didn't cover something in this guide, try our FAQ or message us on tumblr or twitter. We highly suggest you go over this post thoroughly.

Check out our resources!

We've compiled tons and tons of lists and threads for you guys in order to help you out on your jam journey.

Wondering what engine to use? We've got a thread for that.
Still stuck on your concept? Try some of these idea generators.
Completely clueless as to where to start? Try this thread.
Need a team for the jam? Check our teamfinding thread.
Looking for gamedev resources? We got you covered. <link to resource masterpost>
Looking for free assets? Guess what— we've got a list for that too.

Still need some help? Shoot us a question and we'll see what we can do.

Make a dev log on the community!

A development blog is a blog in which a game developer or team talks about the process they've made over the course of the game's creation. Maintaining a devblog keeps your audience in the know and helps facilitate productivity so you'll have something to blog about. It also serves as a record of problems you encounter as well as the solutions you find for those problems.

Development logs are essentially the same thing, except we'll be using the jam forums rather than a blog. However, you are free to use both the forums and your own blog as you develop your game.

Doing so is not necessary at all, but check out all the logs from our first jam! In order to get the most out of your jam experience, it is vital that you interact with your fellow jammers and the community surrounding it. They'll provide valuable feedback and support to help you along the way. So please, we encourage you to mingle, post in other logs, and of course post your own!

In addition, you are encouraged to add images and gifs. Here's some programs to help facilitate that:

Post daily updates!

Post screenshots or fun mishaps to your dev log, twitter, tumblr, or your own blog to track your progress and get feedback. Tag your posts as #MyFirstGameJam so other jammers can find your work! To get the most exposure you can also tag #gamedev or #ScreenshotSaturday for Saturdays! Share your work and link back to your devlog to get feedback.

Manage your time and tasks

We compiled a list here of useful time and task management tools. Set goals early and keep track of how fast it takes you to reach them!

Join the jam chat!

You can go to the discord chat here! Not only is it a great place to interact with other jammers, but it's also a great place to get instant advice, help, and feedback on your progress. You can also get in touch with your jam hosts this way if you have any questions, or are looking for a team.

Be nice!

No one likes being told their game sucks. That's just how it is. And while it's true that in the real world one must face harsh criticize, here at My First Game Jam we aim to create a constructive atmosphere and encourage rather than discourage. Don't be a jerk, and don't give unsolicited critique unless you've been asked to. Always remember to highlight strong points as well as weak points. And, please remember, no one here is trying to put you down. Before you react, ask for clarification. Chances are that no one meant any harm.

Aaaand good luck!

Game dev can be exciting, frustrating, and extremely rewarding. We hope to give you the tools to help you succeed in your goals in the next two weeks! Remember, if you have any questions please feel free to contact one of your jam hosts. You can message one of us in the discord chat, post on our FAQ thread, or tweet/send an ask to our twitter or tumblr.

Some last minute tips:

  • Don't overestimate your skills. Gamedev is a hard and often rocky road and is the culmination of skills that often take years to master. You're going to find yourself getting frustrated, so it's okay to scale back your game.
  • Communicate with your team. It's unwise to let salt build up and be passive-aggressive— this will only take away from your work. Be honest, be clear, and be understanding.
  • 2 weeks isn't enough time to make your magnum opus. You'll set yourself up for disappointment that way. Instead, try to set realistic goals for yourself for your schedule and your allotted work time.
  • Interact with other developers! This will vastly improve your game jam experience, and you'll get to share content, meet new people, and hopefully make friends along the way!
  • Google is your friend. A lot of programming and coding is... essentially knowing how to google things. Don't be afraid to google the shit out of your questions, because it's extremely likely that someone's had the same issue as you at some point.
  • Check out game engine forums. Usually these come attached to the sites you download the engine from, and they're usually stuffed full of information on how to use your engine of choice. We've linked a few resources on our resource list, but this will save you (and us) a lot of time.
  • Remember to take breaks and hydrate! You're gonna be sitting at your PC for hours at a time— so don't forget to stretch your legs every so often.
  • Can't finish your game? Submit it anyway! Be proud of whatever you did, even if you only got through one stage of your platformer or only the first route of your VN.
  • And most importantly, have fun! Remember— the goal is not just to make a game, but to enjoy the process as well!

Let's go make some games!


Official Accounts

Hosts

Lysander
Twitter: @kreutzerland

J
Twitter: @yurigods

Nikki
Twitter: @charblar

Social


hey there Akay! unfortunately this jam is already over! maybe consider checking out our tumblr for updates on the next jam session?

nope, there will be no ranking in this jam!

CUTE ART !!! i love farming sims god... i'm excited..........

vn about a magic worm... i'm in.. gl pal!!!

Posted in [Devlog] june

psst you can insert images with <img src=""> when you switch to raw html form!!! also i am So Down for college-age cultists doing college-age cultist things... my jam

we need more vns, yessss. gl pal!

Posted in [DevLog] Morsel

i love your art!! also... rpgmaker game with cats... i'm in.... i'm hyped...

i've wanted to try ags for a while now!!! i love your aesthetic, the doodly feel is very charming and i love the pixel colors... gl!!

this is so cute so far!!! i love your art also! ✨ i can't wait to see more aaa

j we like the exact same things

remind me 2 tell u one day about my grumpy boneseer forest witch oc bc i feel like u might like her

Created a new topic MEME FIRST GAME JAM
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SHARE YOUR JAM MEMES WITH THE WORLD

NICE TO SEE YOU JOIN!!!

it's me from DSoP! haha, i told my boyfriend about innerspace and the first thing he said was "they probably like dark souls"... i'm guessing from the implicit storytelling method? i could be wrong since i haven't played myself, but i can always appreciate implicit story telling!

(Edited 2 times)
Sample Post
No need to follow my formatting exactly— do what makes sense!

I am a writer/composer looking for an artist!

1. Introduction:
i'm lysander! i like experimental things, story telling, and world-building. i've been writing on/off for 9-10 years and composing for 2-3. my pronouns are he/him and my timezone is -6 central.


2. Skills:

  • i write! i'm not terribly picky with genres, but i love dark themes, urban fantasy, dystopian settings, and modern settings.
  • i compose chiptunesque electronic music with a slew of different influences. i also do piano, neo-classical, ambient stuff.
  • i also am a novice guitarist, intermediate viola player, and i... can kinda sing? i write/sing original songs sometimes.
  • i can kind of draw/paint.
  • i can photo edit pretty well.
  • i am proficient in twine and pretty decent with using renpy.
3. Programs/Languages:
  • photoshop cs3
  • anvil studios
  • fl studios 7
  • fl studios 12 - kinda, still experimenting
  • paint tool sai
  • wavepad editor
  • audacity
  • twine 1.4
  • renpy
  • html/css
4. Portfolio:

Writing: some selected samples | writing blog
Art: art tag | art blog | dA
Music: soundcloud [main] | soundcloud [side]
Games: main itch account | side itch.io with short experimental twines

5. Contact: i have skype, line, kik, slack, discord, and email. i would prefer slack or skype! i also have tumblr and twitter

6. Other: i like lgbt+ content! i value storytelling over mechanics. i love strong aesthetics, weird stuff, anime shit... i have a couple ideas for a game but i'm not too terribly set on those, so i'd love to discuss with other people. thinking of using twine or renpy again, or... i might try doing something retro with webpages?

also, i'm not really REALLY looking for a team (it's there for the sake of example) but please feel free to talk to me anyway! like i said, i'm still thinking about it!

(Edited 1 time)

Team Finding

Making a game all by yourself can be a daunting task. Joining a team helps make the workload manageable and connects you with other people who share the same interests. If you're looking to team up with other people for this jam, here's the place to do it! I know there's a lot of introducing going on, but bear with me a little longer!

Post to the thread with the information below. A sample post will be provided.
Once you've found a team, edit your post to show you're no longer available.

Want to chat before you decide? There's a channel for that on Slack!
Click here to join the official Slack chat! If you're already a member, just head over to #teamfinding!


I am a [role(s)] looking for [role(s) or team]!

1. Introduction: Include any basic information you wish for people to know. I.e., Name, timezone, pronouns, etc. Or go all out and give your entire life philosophy; it's up to you!

2. Skills: Stuff you know how to do, or kind of know how to do. You can also add things you're willing to try.

3. Programs/Languages: Engines/Programs (for any use, be it art, music, game dev, animation, etc) and markup/programming languages you are familiar with.

4. Portfolio: Not terribly necessary, but it'd be a good idea to provide examples of things you've done. Don't sweat it if you're a complete beginner!

5. Contact: Ways to keep in touch. Instant messengers, slack, emails, etc.

6. Other: Anything else you think is important. Have an idea for a game? Stick it here. Have any specific expectations from your team? Stick them here. Anything goes!


Team Tips & Tricks

  • Communication is key! If you have concerns, frustrations, stress, other commitments, it is your responsibility to inform your team so they can help resolve the issue or accommodate. Most of these tips can probably be summarized as communication.
  • Can't do your part? Tell your team. If you have real life obligations, let your team members know so they can either lessen your work load or find someone else to help out.
  • Stay focused! Working together can be fun, but make sure you get things done! This is especially tricky for teams who know eachother well; sometimes the camaraderie can be a distraction.
  • Set clear, manageable goals. This helps everyone stay on the same page and facilitates productivity.
  • Dealing with stress/illness? Putting this one here for myself since I have this issue as well. If you have a history of health problems, whether it is physical or mental, please be up front about it. No one will blame you for needing to take it easy!
  • Use productivity apps/ file sharing sites! There's a plethora of resources for effective team/file management. Google Drive, Dropbox, Slack, and Trello are just a few of them. A list will soon be added here for anyone who wants to give them a whirl.
  • Again: file sharing. Mentioned in the point above, but important enough to warrant its own point. Using a file sharing service like Dropbox enables everyone to work on the same things at the same time as well as allow real-time updates. An artist can stick assets into a shared folder, thus allowing the programmer to instantly access it. Making changes is much easier too. Highly recommend teams do this!
  • Frustrated with your group? Nothing is perfect. Even with people you get along with, you're bound to have conflict. Keep a cool head and remember: even terrible game jam experiences have value. Be willing to carry on and don't give up!


(Edited 4 times)

Courtesy of @Karythina, thank you and bless your soul.


Hi guys!! It's me, your pal Lys here to start the hype train an entire month early! I thought the forum looked awfully lonely without anything in it, so I decided I'd get things started by booting up a little discussion here.

If you don't already know me, I'm Lysander, your small and anxious co-admin, and I'm a writer with a passion for storytelling through various mediums. One of my absolute favorites is game development, no matter how small or sloppy the project is. I really, REALLY believe everyone should give game development a try because it opens up so many possibilities for seeing your ideas come to life! Outside of that, I'm a 21 year old noncisgendered asian american going to school for web development while also dealing with some moderate anxiety issues. I want everyone to feel welcome here and to not be afraid! I know how intimidating it can be to try something new, so that's why we're all here together!

Now that that's out of the way, please feel free to introduce yourself! Here's a little something to get you started:

1. Hi there! What's your name? Want to introduce yourself?

2. Did you participate in the last jam we held? If so, what do you plan on doing better this time? If not, what's your reason for joining?

3. What games are your favorites? Did any of them inspire you, or made you want to make your own?

4. Do you have experience with game development? What did you do/with what engine?

5. Tell us about something you're passionate about!


Let's get to know eachother!

hi there! i'm lysander and i'm a 21 year old nonbinary person (he/him) and i'd like to join or form a group with a concept to work with for this game jam! normally i'd probably just go solo, but for the length of time we're given, it'd make more sense to do a larger project, which i don't have the energy for attempting solo at the moment. so i'd like to help others out!

also, if you're familiar with My First Game Jam, i was one of the cohosts!

i'm a writer of about 9-10 years of "experience" if you can call it that, and i'm also a hobbyist musician. been experimenting with electronic stuff for 2-4 years, but i've had general music training for about 5 years prior to that. i also like to compose simple stuff on the guitar and sing, albeit amateurishly. you can find samples of my music on my music commission page. i also draw a little bit, but not terribly well. writing samples can be provided on request.

i've worked with both renpy and twine and i'm comfortable enough with them— moreso twine, but i've been using renpy a lot on my own projects as well. some wips and games i've made are on my itch page!

anyway, i would love to work together or join a team, so if you're interested in any of my skill sets, please contact me:

heliotype[@]mail.com OR @kreutzerland on twitter.

hi claire! i'm a hobby musician with a couple years of experience. i can do something with the mood/samples you've described, if you haven't found a composer yet! here's my soundcloud, and here are some links to songs that vaguely fit your theme. i have a LOT of samples in a number of different genres, and judging by the examples you've given, i think i can definitely do something for you. i don't charge for game projects since i like participating in them!

https://soundcloud.com/xysander/flowers-for
https://soundcloud.com/xysander/starless
https://soundcloud.com/xysander/sparklesmell

i also have pure 8bit samples and others samples on my commission page.

if you're interested, you can email me at heliotype[@]mail.com or tweet at me @kreutzerland! we can discuss more details that way!

hello i am lysander! you guys saw me around already!!!

my twitter is @kreuzerland and my tumblr is kreutzerland also, but i don't regularly update it. before following my twitter, please know that i tweet a lot about my personal life, which consists mostly of mundane things that i turn into jokes, so please be aware of that before following me!!

you can also reach me at heliotype[@]mail.com; i check at least once a day.

i'll edit this post later, but for twine games, i highly recommend porpentine's work, especially howling dogs and with those we love alive.

Created a new topic POST-JAM WRAP-UP
(Edited 1 time)

Hello everyone!! It's your co-host Lysander here to finally gush at ya'll about how amazing this experience has been!

Let's get business out of the way first: Take this exit poll to help us improve the next jam we do!
Any comments, compliments, concerns, or complaints:
send them to the jam tumblr, anon is fine!

Also check out the jam-end post on tumblr for more useful links!

We'll be hosting another MFGJ in the summer, so look out for us in a new months!



First of, let me thank each and everyone one of you for taking that leap of faith and joining us, especially those of you who were afraid, nervous, and clueless— you've been working, persevering, and you were all amazing and brave! It's a big step to go from the want to to have done, but you did it! And I couldn't be more proud of you!!

When J first asked me to co-host this jam, I immediately agreed since we'd been talking about doing something like this for a little while, but I honestly had no idea how big it would get! An unbelievable number of likes/retweets, some from well-established artists and programmers, and nearly 480 interested participants! That number was far from what I was expecting, and it's incredible that so many people put aside the time to try something new, or to pick up an old project to finally breathe life back into. And now— 98 entries later, I'm finally seeing the fruits of ya'll's effort from these last two weeks. Every single entry is something to be proud of, and I hope you guys are as proud of yourselves as I am of you. Congratulations! You've done something— even if that doesn't sound like much, that's more than many people ever do.

Now to get into the meat of why I believe doing jams like this is important— why we need to encourage non-developers to start making games. I've spoken on Twitter about this a few times, but the AAA game industry is depressingly stagnant in the way that it can be an unfriendly place to those who aren't familiar with programming or development. Being a gamedev is hard. Getting into it professionally is even harder, as such a field requires study in subjects that are difficult for many people. Because of this, the diversity in the game industry is pitiable. Now, one should take my words with grain of salt— I'm no gamer. Never have, probably never will be. But as someone who loves to create, I believe games are an excellent way to tell a story, to add personal agency to an experience which utterly changes the impression it makes on the audience. This was the thought imprinted on me as a 12 year old, sitting at my desktop and playing Yume Nikki and being utterly in wonder of how simple, 2d backdrops and music could so thoroughly transport me to another world. I believe we need more games like this— games that are arguably not games, but still, interactive things that give you an experience. And as someone who loves to create, I know there's so many people out there who have entire stories, universes, characters locked away in their heads, and they think about bringing them to life, but just don't know how, or are too intimated to try. There's people who, for one reason or another, have been locked out of a path of game development because of stereotypes, discrimination, being told that you can't do it because of some reason that is absolutely arbitrary.

I think that's all bullshit. I think anyone can make a game. The difficulty in doing so depends on what kind of game you want to make, but a game can be as simple as some words on a screen. It can be as complex as you want it to be. But the thing is that all these games, created by people who never made any before, present a different narrative— a different perspective than big-name titles or companies. These little homebrew things are as personal as it gets, and it's that intimacy that I love about the indie game developer. And I sincerely want everyone to know that, and to be brave— tell your stories, make your games, heck, it doesn't even need a story. But make something. Share yourself with the world. It's scary sometimes, like I'm sure many parts of this jam was. But the joy of completion, the joy of seeing people interact with your work— the idea that you actually made something— these are all these you deserve.

I love you guys! <3 Thank you for everything! I can't wait to play everything you all have made.

If you'd like to keep in contact, I'll keep the game jam chat on discord open permanently, and/or you can always get me on twitter @kreutzerland.

Posted in Thank you

that's what this jam was for!!! thank you for participating!!! honestly we couldn't have done it without you and every one of the participants!!

i've been slacking in checking updates but omg this looks sooo good T___T i can't wait to play (after i cry and rush to put a demo out of my own game)))

(Edited 1 time)

i believe quest should port to html5? i may need to check, but i believe that's what it said in the description. o:

i may be misunderstanding though. can you please clarify?

the graphics are super cute!! i would really love to see this finished!!!

oh this looks really nice!!! i love this concept!

this is so cute!!! i saw your stuff on twitter and it looks so gooood

your designs, yeesssss.... i love them @___@ also holy crap, congrats on that word count!! man, i gotta get to work and catch up!!

as i said in the chat, great post!! i'm very happy to hear that although some feel lukewarm about their game at best, they're proud for having come away with new skills and a new understanding of how game development works! and really, once you do it the first time, each subsequent time will get easier and easier. it won't ever be easy, but it does get easier. like any skill, game development takes time and practice— but the important thing is to keep trying, even if your attempts aren't as great as you want them to be. those are just as important as the successes— maybe even more so.

the solidarity between jammers is part of what makes jams so fun. meeting people who are interested in doing the same thing, and seeing everyone's progress— i think it makes trying gamedev for the first time a lot more enjoyable and a lot less intimidating. as for myself, i've met some awesome people and i've had so much fun seeing people's progress!

i'm going to save the main bulk of my thoughts for the post-jam wrap up, so that's all for now. good work guys!! :3c

updatesssss

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hi guys! for anyone who wishes to use it, i've made a discord chat for the game jam! no account needed!

join the chat here!

  • there's two text-only channels: #general for chatting, and #support for devtalk and other questions.
  • there's also a voice chat available as well, and to join it, all you need to do is enable your mic in the lower left hand corner, and click the channel to join.
  • right next to it is the disconnect button, which allows you to leave the voice channel.
  • type @username to mention someone.
  • type @everyone to mention everyone
  • gif posting is supported!
  • copy/pasting screenshots/snips is supported! just paste directly into the chat.

the cool thing about discord is that it allows uploading of gifs & pics, so it's great for showing off wips or getting help on particular problems. happy jamming!

ooh, this looks so good!! 90s anime? i'm feeling some major evangelion vibes ehehe... i love eva so this is excellent!!!