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SCREAM CATALOGUE

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A member registered Sep 10, 2018 · View creator page →

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Hi, thanks for getting in touch! 

The jam generally doesn't have strict requirements, however in the spirit of a game jam format it's generally perferred that games will be made for the jam during the jam period, at most integrating minor/structural parts of an earlier engine/project. This is to encourage people to share their dev experiences, learn/try something new, and put the games on a more equal footing (although the competitive aspect of this jam is relatively light).

Due to vote brigading this jam has a voting system that is open only to other participants - for that reason if the game is limited to those that pay for it, there may not be too many people voting and interacting with it.

I hope that answers your question! Best of luck with the larger project that you're working on.

Great addition! This adds a lot more utility in giving more options to figure out which chords are compatible with one another in the same key. Looking forward to future updates!

Hey, this is super cool! As someone that isn't musically trained it's hard to figure out what notes the chords constitute - it'd be cool to have a feature that shows that. Really useful tool! 

Welcome to SCREAMWORLD! Thanks for joining - or considering joining - the third instalment of SCREAM JAM. I'm looking forward to playing all your submissions come the end of the jam in early March, and hope to be seriously spooked in the process! 

I'm SCREAM CATALOGUE (@screamcatalogue) - and, if you couldn't infer from the name, I've been running a bunch of horror game jams since October to encourage scary, surreal, and downright weird games on Itch! I've made a few games with Caveware Digital (@caveware) since 2014. The last game we made was Ghost Dance, which was made for the SCREAM SEASON game jam in December.

 Feel free to introduce yourself in this thread and plug your own work. What projects have you worked on? 

This was probably the darkest submission for a SCREAM JAM so far! I liked how you dealt with quite gratuitous themes whilst not getting carried away with them. Great idea to take inspiration from a real-world story which lent the narrative an aura of realism. The sound design, as said by others, was done well and contributed to the atmosphere. I liked how you handled the narrator, whose paranoid and depraved worldview, as fia glas mentioned, raised questions as to the boundaries between reality and fantasy. Having done a lot of study in criminal litigation let me tell ya, the world of crime is even more dark and surreal than the bizarre and unsettling narrative this story conjures! Good work! 

I have a soft spot for RPG Maker games and I think this is the first game to use it in a SCREAM JAM so I really liked this! It was a good experience that harnessed the neat idea about being able to interrogate lost souls to resolve their internal conflicts and allow them to pass to the hereafter. The addition of multiple endings was really cool and suited the afterlife tone of the game. It was also a fun opportunity to write lots of different ghost characters with their own afterlife crises; the snarky tone of the protagonist kinda makes it clear you had a blast when writing this. As others have said the only constructive criticism I can offer - like many RPG Maker games - is that the stock assets didn't quite fit everything they were used for, particularly the character portraits. Thanks for contributing to SCREAM SEASON!

I have a soft spot for RPG Maker games and I think this is the first game to use it in a SCREAM JAM so I really liked this! It was a good experience that harnessed the neat idea about being able to interrogate lost souls to resolve their internal conflicts and allow them to pass to the hereafter. The addition of multiple endings was really cool and suited the afterlife tone of the game. It was also a fun opportunity to write lots of different ghost characters with their own afterlife crises; the snarky tone of the protagonist kinda makes it clear you had a blast when writing this. As others have said the only constructive criticism I can offer - like many RPG Maker games - is that the stock assets didn't quite fit everything they were used for, particularly the character portraits. Thanks for contributing to SCREAM SEASON!

Good work on a Twine interactive story - it's great to see so many being made for this jam! I like how this short story uses a really neat thing I've seen in Twine which is where links are used to expand and elaborate on the meaning of words integrated into the story. I think leaving the cause of what you've done ambiguous was a good way to leave the horror up to the interpretation of the reader. Thanks for contributing! 

Good work on a Twine interactive story - it's great to see so many being made for this jam! I like how this short story uses a really neat thing I've seen in Twine which is where links are used to expand and elaborate on the meaning of words integrated into the story. I think leaving the cause of what you've done ambiguous was a good way to leave the horror up to the interpretation of the reader. Thanks for contributing! 

This is a cute little game! The PICO-8  is an awesome platform and I'm glad you're getting a handle of it. I like the backstory you made to this game, which is a simple collection / avoidance game but surprisingly quite challenging! As others have said that ghost goes too damn fast, but I was able to get four presents before giving up! I think if I were to change the game mechanics (I understand this is WIP) I'd add a grace period for the ghost chase and maybe improve the acceleration on the player when holding down the arrow key input. Thanks for submitting this game to SCREAM JAM! 

This is a cute little game! The PICO-8  is an awesome platform and I'm glad you're getting a handle of it. I like the backstory you made to this game, which is a simple collection / avoidance game but surprisingly quite challenging! As others have said that ghost goes too damn fast, but I was able to get four presents before giving up! I think if I were to change the game mechanics (I understand this is WIP) I'd add a grace period for the ghost chase and maybe improve the acceleration on the player when holding down the arrow key input. Thanks for submitting this game to SCREAM JAM!  

Unfortunately at this stage there is no save function in the game. However, the game isn't long - it should take about 30 min to complete. Sorry! 

Haha thanks! No worries for the confusion - I've seen that question come up a few times.

You start far away from the Lynch cube. Try walking towards him until the UI displays his name. If that doesn't work, let us know and we'll look into it!

Thanks so much for the LP! Big fan of the commentary and jokes on this one. Not sure if the game is more or less weird not knowing Lynch's works but I'm glad you enjoyed it nonetheless!

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Hey! Try moving around with WASD and clicking to interact - it's not a splash screen, by that point, you're 'in' the game world, so to speak.  It's a little confusing!

Hey! Try moving around with WASD and clicking to interact - it's not a splash screen, by that point, you're 'in' the game world, so to speak.  It's a little confusing!

Let me know when you update it! I definitely could do for some more bowling haha

Thanks for the feedback, it's super appreciated! Yeah, there's definitely some tedium in the game we could have ideally smoothed out. When specifically did the crash happen for you? I'll get Josef to look into it. 

I know it's unfinished, but there's an amusing sense of humor to the narrator's sense of disinterested detachment as you enter the endgame and die. "Yeah, you're in a freezer. Smart move. / No, you die / people find your frozen corpse in the morning" made me crack up. It's also a good Twine project that has some choices to stop it being too linear, a neat rhyming structure, and an original horror setting. Good job on this one!

Good job on a narrative-focused game! I think the atmosphere for this one was done well - the apathetically morbid tone of the characters was great and the minimal and humorous dialogue made for an amusing contrast to the subject matter. I wasn't quite sure where this was going to go - you obviously had a blast making a creative world within which lurk a range of dark and creepy characters.

For constructive criticism, I think a narrative-focused game probably needs some sort of closure; the ending was anticlimactic and confusing. Moreover some sort of interaction to give the player a sense of agency would enhance the 'on rails' nature of the game. Thanks again for contributing to the SCREAM JAMs and I hope you keep on making a bunch of unique, creepy games on the site!   

Good job on a narrative-focused game! I think the atmosphere for this one was done well - the apathetically morbid tone of the characters was great and the minimal and humorous dialogue made for an amusing contrast to the subject matter. I wasn't quite sure where this was going to go - you obviously had a blast making a creative world within which lurk a range of dark and creepy characters.

For constructive criticism, I think a narrative-focused game probably needs some sort of closure; the ending was anticlimactic and confusing. Moreover some sort of interaction to give the player a sense of agency would enhance the 'on rails' focus of the game. Thanks again for contributing to the SCREAM JAMs and I hope you keep on making a bunch of unique, creepy games on the site!   

For a two-day submission this is good fun. The idea to play as an elf who reluctantly is forced to bowl using the bodies of his elf friends as pins is a devilishly evil one! I guess Christmas isn't gonna be so merry after all...

Given the context the game was made in, constructive criticism seems a bit unnecessary, but the bowling would have been a little more interesting and uncertain with some basic physics/spin or a quicker bowling speed. Also, I did find the secret skeleton in the bottom left of the alley!

For a two-day submission this is good fun. The idea to play as an elf who reluctantly is forced to bowl using the bodies of his elf friends as pins is a devilishly evil one! I guess Christmas isn't gonna be so merry after all...

Given the context the game was made in, constructive criticism seems a bit unnecessary, but the bowling would have been a little more interesting and uncertain with some basic physics/spin or a quicker bowling speed. Also, I did find the secret skeleton in the bottom left of the alley!

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Great to see a good number of writing projects harnessing Twine this year; I think this was the best. This experience used the CSS in Twine in a lot of technically interesting ways that I think elevated the experience a lot, such as through video clips, animated text, pop-ups and even fake errors. This has to be pushing what Twine can do to its limits and it's very impressive to see it used in such a diverse way.

The central conceit of an unreliable narrator going through revisions of a story surrounding an incident was aided by the meta 'glitches' representing a collapse of the veracity of the story (or perhaps the intentional manipulation of memory on the part of the narrator)? I think the deconstruction in reverse was a good arc to generally lead the reader against the narrator's account.

The integration of multimedia to depict some of the disturbing actions by the narrator made this game a lot more unsettling and provided a good counterpoint to the writing. The bait and switch of the horror being centred on the location, then the house, then the actions of the narrator was a good way to manage the reader's expectations and constantly shift the source of the horror in this game.

Great work on this one! I think this writing shows a lot of maturity, and combined with the technical accomplishment of pulling this experience off in Twine, I'm really surprised you composed and polished this in a little over a week. Can't wait to see what projects you work on next. 

Also, have you read any of Mark Z Danielewksi's works? This was kind of reminiscent of the unhinged, form-defying approach I saw in 'House of Leaves'. 

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Great to see a good number of writing projects harnessing Twine this year; I think this was the best. This experience used the CSS in Twine in a lot of technically interesting ways that I think elevated the experience a lot, such as through video clips, animated text, pop-ups and even fake errors. This has to be pushing what Twine can do to its limits and it's very impressive to see it used in such a diverse way.

The central conceit of an unreliable narrator going through revisions of a story surrounding an incident was aided by the meta 'glitches' representing a collapse of the veracity of the story (or perhaps the intentional manipulation of memory on the part of the narrator)? I think the deconstruction in reverse was a good arc to generally lead the reader against the narrator's account.

The integration of multimedia to depict some of the disturbing actions by the narrator made this game a lot more unsettling and provided a good counterpoint to the writing. The bait and switch of the horror being centred on the location, then the house, then the actions of the narrator was a good way to manage the reader's expectations and constantly shift the source of the horror in this game.

Great work on this one! I think this writing shows a lot of maturity, and combined with the technical accomplishment of pulling this experience off in Twine, I'm really surprised you composed and polished this in a little over a week. Can't wait to see what projects you work on next. 

Also, have you read any of Mark Z Danielewksi's works? This was kind of reminiscent of the unhinged, form-defying approach I saw in 'House of Leaves'. 

Nice proof of concept! I'm not familiar with Marlowe's plays, so this was an interesting introduction. It's kind of reminiscent of retro educational software from maybe the early nineties or so. It's definitely a niche approach, but I don't think anyone is remotely doing anything like this. Good work! 

Nice proof of concept! I'm not familiar with Marlowe's plays, so this was an interesting introduction. It's kind of reminiscent of retro educational software from maybe the early nineties or so. It's definitely a niche approach, but I don't think anyone is remotely doing anything like this. Good work! 

Thanks! I agree, the Shed has come to be my favorite stage too, mechanics-wise. Making Lynch evil was definitely a cop-out and the reason was to basically guarantee a quick 'twist' resolution of a plot and because this game thematically follows a game I wrote for earlier called Samsara Interactive. There's just something funny about being double-crossed to cosmic proportions. Nearly all of our games have an intentionally obtuse cosmology that is inhabited by celebrities doubling as godlike beings. Cheers for the comments, hope to do a proper run of Three Mile when I get home tonight!

This is a polished and deviously tricky survival game! The idea of a decaying fire running cold runs into the theme well and acts as a good survival mechanic - I like how attacking and defeating monsters affects the wick in some way. I was going to say that the enemies were kinda cute and not that scary until I saw the four-legged crawler thing make a beeline for me, at which point I think my heart skipped a beat. It'd be interesting to see where this idea could go - perhaps the game could extend beyond surviving 'waves' but also exploring/collecting on top of protecting the fire? Great job!

Hey, no need to disparage the game - it's executed well! The atmosphere is great with the distorted electronic noise, the overlay of constant snow, and the endless wasteland of wilderness on either side of the house. This plays like a decent survival game with all the core mechanics implemented well and really this idea has a lot of potential if you wanted to polish it into a complete experience - I think it'd make a great game if expanded a little more.

One key feedback is on presentation of the game - it might be more intuitive to add control tips / tutorials to the game to make play more intuitive rather than picking up the details on the game page, but I got the hang of how things worked soon enough. Some ideas for implementation might be figuring out how to make the experience more varied - maybe there could be increasing difficulty making the survival mode more challenging, zombies 'attacking' the house, different types of enemies, or a more complex and quickly-depleted needs system. 

Great job!

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Hey, no need to disparage the game - it's executed well! The atmosphere is great with the distorted electronic noise, the overlay of constant snow, and the endless wasteland of wilderness on either side of the house. This plays like a decent survival game with all the core mechanics implemented well and really this idea has a lot of potential if you wanted to polish it into a complete experience - I think it'd make a great game if expanded a little more.

One key feedback is on presentation of the game - it might be more intuitive to add control tips / tutorials to the game to make play more intuitive rather than picking up the details on the game page, but I got the hang of how things worked soon enough. Some ideas for implementation might be figuring out how to make the experience more varied - maybe there could be increasing difficulty making the survival mode more challenging, zombies 'attacking' the house, different types of enemies, or a more complex and quickly-depleted needs system. 

Great job!

Thanks for the comment! Hope the trial and error through some of the more difficult parts of the game were worth it; trying to find a balance between accessible and challenging is definitely tricky for a "survival" horror -type game. Cheers!

Thanks very much! This was our first foray into doing a 3D game, but some of the choices, like billboarded sprites, were definitely inspired by a fondness for DOS-era 3D games. A lot of tireless work went into making this, so the praise is super appreciated!

Looks great! Kinda getting a Polar Express vibe from the setting idea. 

Congrats on all the self-made assets; I'm only just starting with 3D and it's so tricky - so it's great to see an effort to stay original with asset creation.

Look forward to seeing how this shapes up!

Hi!

Thanks for submitting 'All Star Murder' to the SCREAM SEASON jam! 

Unfortunately, SCREAM SEASON is a jam intended for creating new games during the jam period. Also, whilst users are free to charge for their games if they wish generally, doing so in a jam is unlikely to cause the submission to be played or rated. 

For these reasons we've removed the game from the jam. Thanks for understanding. Hope 'All Star Murder' shapes up to be a cool game! 

- SCREAM CATALOGUE

Hi, thanks for joining! It's completely up to you - there's no need or expectation for you to mention the jam's name in the content of your game or the submission description. Cheers! 

Good job on this - the idea that the game becomes progressively 'corrupted' is an interesting idea that harks back to the randomised textures of LSD Dream Emulator quite well. Would have been nice to explore a little more without the boundaries, but I like the scenes that you created for this!

Love the lo-fi approach; I was able to explore everything pretty quickly I think. Interesting that it was also inspired by a dream journal - have you seen the published version of Osamu Sato's journal? Anyway, this echoes the atmosphere and mechanics of LSD Dream Emulator pretty well. Good job! 

Really enjoyed exploring the surreal house and all the creatures that hang out in it. I carried them and put them all down near the TV so they could listen to the weird tapes and hum along to them. They seem to be having fun (?)