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RENZ

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A member registered Jul 13, 2022 · View creator page →

Creator of

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(1 edit)

Stay up to date with the development of the game and or get studio credits here!

// Pushing Action Gameplay

I’ve added a combo system to really help push (literally) more action in my game.

There’s still the element of playing tactically, where you pick your fights and use the environment to your advantage, but I just ultimately want to prevent hide and seek gameplay. I already have other ways to prevent this such as:

  1. Making the first enemy encountered in the game to seek the players
  2. Starting a celestial event like a meteor shower that forces players to keep it moving

A combo counter is just another layer of this and it makes the experience more rewarding.

// Rewards

When players successfully chains a certain amount of kills, I’m designing it so that they get coins to buy upgrades or heals.

If they’re really good, they get rewarded with an increased max health or a plain heal. These rewards are given right away.

// Breaking Chains

Combo chains break when:

  • the timer runs out and the player hasn’t killed an enemy
  • the player gets hit

#// Small Details

It’s like a mini-game within the game.

It adds another challenge, but doing combos is not the focus I want for the gameplay, so I try to express this in my design by not showing the counter unless there had been 5 successful chains.

I don’t want players to be afraid of dropping combos.

The same rewards can be earned by focusing on collecting coins.

Again, the combo system is just another challenge.

// Conclusion

Lots to be done still.

Subscribe to support development of the game and check out the rest of the series where I do a major overhaul of Alpha: Omnipresence!

— Renz Rivero

// October Contributors

Special thank you shout out to the following ongoing generous supporters of my work, making a difference in the world and mine.

  • Laura Milligan
  • Jacob Huang
  • Andrew Abrook
  • Faiz Prasla
  • Armaigne Rivero
  • Joshua Ravasco

Stay up to date with the development of the game and or get studio credits here!

// Continuing my Last Game in Unity

This devlog and the one coming after was sort of spoiled by my previous devlog with the whole Unity situation.

The gist is that Unity ended up reverting their plans way back to the point that I’m comfortable enough to continue with the progress I have with this project rather than starting from zero with Godot.

With that said, trust is lost. The real damage will show up for Unity once everyone’s done with their dev cycles and are ready to make their next game, which will likely be on a different engine.

Anyway, onto the devlog…


// Creating Sprites that Represent each Player Stat

Recently, I’ve been working on simple icons to represent player stats for my game.

What I’m using to do all of it is Inkscape and its a free and open source vector graphics software.

// New Level Up Menu

Check video out for the new look of the level up menu with the new icons.

Doing quick research on layout design tells me that a vertical layout promotes a more focused scanning flow.

So, I’m taking advantage to help make the information provided in each card easier to take in being that your eyes are fixated on one single area rather than having your attention divided into the left and right halves of the screen.

// Stat Info Row

Along with these changes are the row of icons just below the experience bar.

I think it’s a nice addition to let players know the upgrades they’ve made and what level each of them are at.

// Conclusion

It’s the small details that go a long way.

Let me know your thoughts and opinions with the changes in the comments!

Thanks for catching this one and check out the rest of the series where I do a major overhaul of Alpha: Omnipresence.

— Renz Rivero

// September Contributors

Special thank you shout out to the following ongoing generous supporters of my work, making a difference in the world and mine.

  • Laura Milligan
  • Jacob Huang
  • Andrew Abrook
  • Faiz Prasla
  • Armaigne Rivero
  • Joshua Ravasco

Stay up to date with the development of the game and or get studio credits here!

You’re looking at thousands of hours of work in the Unity engine that I’m about to abandon.

// What Made me Reevaluate my Game Engine of Choice

On September 12, Unity made an announcement to update their pricing and plan that charges developers 20 cents per install of any games that came from their engine starting next year.

This fee only gets triggered when a game successfully hits both of the following:

  • Make $200,000 USD revenue in the last year
  • Get a lifetime install of at least 200,000

At the basic level, if a game is over the given threshold, this means that people can repeatedly install and uninstall a game to make a developer/studio go bankrupt. Now, just imagine when that process gets automated with software.

There’s nothing Unity can do to accurately track the number of installs without going through privacy concerns.

My games are nowhere near the threshold, but what the hell am I doing if I didn’t believe that someday I will trigger the installation fees with my games.

I’ll be seeking open source options like Godot to keep my peace of mind and have maximum ownership of the games I will be producing in the future.

I’ve already dropped all of my progress in Unity and started converting everything to Godot ever since I found out about the news.

// How it’s Going with Godot so Far

This is how it’s going so far and I’m trusting myself to get back to where I was in this new engine.

Updates may come through slowly, but I’m stubborn as hell so I’ll make it happen somehow someway.

Cheers for reading all the way to here.

— Renz Rivero

// September Contributors

Special thank you shout out to the following ongoing generous supporters of my work, making a difference in the world and mine.

  • Laura Milligan
  • Jacob Huang
  • Andrew Abrook
  • Faiz Prasla
  • Armaigne Rivero
  • Joshua Ravasco

Stay up to date with the development of the game and or get studio credits here!

Game development subreddits are excellent spaces to get feedback and stories that help stay rational as a game developer.

// Implementing Feedback!

// Adding Stars

I really liked this comment from Artisticslap, suggesting to replace the fast moving particles with non-intrusive stars.

So, I changed the particles and the system itself to spawn around the planet.

// Aligning UI Elements

Someone also commented about the unaligned user interface.

I did ask for feedback and presentation can go a long way even if it was and still is a work in progress, so I should’ve known better.

Thanks to this person, it’s aligned now and has brighter colour for better impression.

// Less Saturated Colours

With all the 3D game objects, I also made their colours come out more by increasing the intensity of lighting in the game.

I did make adjustments to some material colouring, but having better lighting did most of the work.

// Post-Processing

There were also comments about needing shadows to connect objects better to the planet and adding a gradient to the background.

Thankfully, I got post-processing to work in Unity again so I added in the Vignette and Ambient Occlusion effects to check these comments off of the list.

// Conclusion

Check out the rest of the series where I give this game, Alpha: Omnipresence, a major makeover!

Thank you for stopping by!

// September Contributors

Special thank you shout out to the following ongoing generous supporters of my work, making a difference in the world and mine.

  • Laura Milligan
  • Jacob Huang
  • Andrew Abrook
  • Faiz Prasla
  • Armaigne Rivero
  • Joshua Ravasco

Stay up to date with the development of the game and or get studio credits here!

Yet another devlog in the series where I give my very first published game, Alpha: Omnipresence, a major makeover!

Taking a break from adding new things into the game, I dedicated the past week making the current art a little better.

// Colour Contrast

I made everything interactable within planets pop out more using brighter colours and light emitting materials.

This include the coins, enemies, the recent meteor shower plus spike additions, and more.

It’s a simple way to help players differentiate them from the planet’s environment.

// Smaller and Less Obstacles

Speaking of planet environment, I went over all 24 planets currently in the game to make some environmental changes.

I scaled most of the objects down enough to provide a better looking proportion compared to the player’s size, while keeping it tall enough for players to actually hide behind and use to guard themselves from projectiles.

I also cut down on how much obstacles there are in each world.

Not only do these changes take away clutter, but they also make the game perform better by giving the spawning logic for everything in the game more surface area to work with!

Here are two planets (planet sometime and competition) and how they look before and after the changes.

// Enemy Range

Since there are less obstacles and more open spaces in each planet, I also lowered the range that make enemies start to aim their shot towards the player so that the difficulty gets balanced again.

// Looking for Feedback

Anyway, how else can I improve the visuals? What would you change about the plain coloured backgrounds?

As of now, I’m thinking of adding texture on the backgrounds.

Please let me know your thoughts in the comments!

Thank you for tuning in.

// September Contributors

Special thank you shout out to the following ongoing generous supporters of my work, making a difference in the world and mine.

  • Laura Milligan
  • Jacob Huang
  • Andrew Abrook
  • Faiz Prasla
  • Armaigne Rivero
  • Joshua Ravasco

Stay up to date with the development of the game and or get studio credits here!

(1 edit)

Here’s another devlog in the series where I take apart my very first published game, Alpha: Omnipresence!

// Spawning System

I’m continuing to recycle the same code and logic used to spawn just about everything in this game to further come up with interesting features that fit in with the game.

This time around, I came up with these pads that launch enemies off of the planet when they step on it and this is how it all looked in the beginning.

These launch pads are part of the upgrade options players get every time they level up and more and more of these pads will spawn for each upgrade made.

// Creating the Launch Pad Model

Then, I found that there were launch pads in Fortnite so I created my own inspired model in Blender.

// Emphasizing Takeoff

In Unity, I created and added an effect that emphasizes enemies getting launched off the planet.

// Result

The sound effects are still in the works, but here’s the end result for how it all looks!

Thank you for tuning in.

// September Contributors

Special thank you shout out to the following ongoing generous supporters of my work, making a difference in the world and mine.

  • Laura Milligan
  • Jacob Huang
  • Andrew Abrook
  • Faiz Prasla
  • Armaigne Rivero
  • Joshua Ravasco

Register to playtest Alpha: Omnipresence when the update is ready here!

Back with another devlog in the series where I completely turn my first published game, Alpha: Omnipresence, feel like a completely new game!

// Reusing Code

I reused the code I wrote for the wave spawning of the meteor shower I showcased in one of my previous devlogs, so this took only 3 development sessions to get going.

Spikes spawn in nearby locations from the player and respawns when it doesn’t get stepped on.

When you decide to stay on it for some reason, it won’t respawn and will continue to hurt you every 2 seconds.

// Creating the Spike Model

Then, I got to work in Blender to make a simple spike model that actually looks like something you shouldn’t step on in the game.

// Making the Spike Stand Out

Back in Unity, I created and added colour to the spikes that help it stand out even more.

// Particle Effects

As a finishing touch, I added particle effects every time you step on them.

Thank you again for tuning in.

// August Contributors

Special thank you shout out to the following ongoing generous supporters of my work, making a difference in the world and mine.

  • Laura Milligan
  • Jacob Huang
  • Andrew Abrook
  • Faiz Prasla
  • Armaigne Rivero
  • Joshua Ravasco

Join other members in having your name in the game credits of Alpha: Omnipresence here

Thank you! I am looking forward to the release of your Bulb game as well!

Hello world and welcome back to another Rainy Day devlog! There’s the project’s official name. It’s on the title and it’s also registered in my targeted markets, which is Android and iOS.

As I’m coming to an end with the discovery phase I have previously mentioned in the first devlog, the overall idea has become more clear and I have done a lot of reflection about the project as well as game development in general. Like why a financial literacy/educational kind of game? What is the motive? And these are questions good to be answered early on; otherwise, you won’t know if the project aligns with your soul and you may just completely “lose” it halfway through the project, right?

Ever since reading “Reality is Broken” by author Jane McGonigal, one of my recommended books for anyone, even outside of the gaming/game development field, I have been inspired to aim for something bigger with my game development studio. It’s several statements I rephrased from the book as a question, and it is: “how could I leverage the power of games to reinvent everything from government, health care, and education to traditional media, marketing, and entrepreneurship – perhaps even world peace?” How could all game developers? How could you or I do it?

Hence, my attempts with this financial literacy game I am starting. Because I believe games can change the world in many ways, the book I just mentioned explores and will explain more clearly than I ever will. Games changed my world. Early on with Pokemon cards, yes, games don’t have to be just digital apps; the gameplay of it taught me how to make the most out of the cards I am handed with. It’s in the subconscious and I really believe that it bled into my real life. It taught me to make the most out of the things I have in my life. And Pokemon is a game for just one example. There are several more games and I am sure you and everyone in the world has been affected by games in many ways that is hard to notice.

Another reflection I have done is based on a question I’ve been asked personally before, and it goes something like, “out of all the software you can make, why games?” I knew I had the work ethic to make games, I am fully engaged when I develop, and obsess over every little thing about the projects I start, yet, I struggled to answer the question and just said “because I love making games.” I’m a bit reserved, so it’s maybe why I answered like that, but it’s also because I didn’t know how to answer it.

You know, apps like Uber, Airbnb, online shopping apps, etc, are apps that are out there making big impactful changes in our world. And that is the real worldview for most apps, too. They are tools that may help and will make big changes in peoples lives. With games, the reality is that people view them pretty much just as a time-pass hobby and just a way to escape real life. As something not to be treated seriously, but it’s simply not true. “It’s just a game.” These points are all true, but games can be so much more. Games can also be serious tools that can have the same impact as Uber, Airbnb, and all these other apps. A quick google search looking back in history, we can find that the Lydians used games to ease hunger many years ago by taking turns with who is eating and who is playing. Look into it if you’d like!

So, all in all, I choose to develop games out of all the software I can make because I don’t see a difference with their potential to impact a bigger cause. It just depends on the game being developed. I’ve been rambling, but again, Jane McGonigal’s book, Reality is Broken, beautifully puts together everything I’m talking about, and in a much better way. For the game developers, the mission I try to aim out can be yours too! Or at the very least, ask yourself why you are developing the game that you are making and really define that. Key word is aim. At the end of the day, games are in the entertainment genre just like movies are. Gamified learning, aka educational games, are a more direct approach to this aim, but there are indirect ways as well with the use of the game’s whole story narrative.

I hope the things I brought up got you thinking for the better, especially the game developers out there!

Consider subscribing to become a beta tester for Rainy Day once it’s available. Its free and do join the Discord community where we can we can communicate more closely!

Thank you again and take care always.

Special thank you shoutout to my supporters who donated in August Thank you Laura Milligan

It’s all you! You caught yourself and became aware. I’m glad you found it helpful and I wish you goodluck with The Bulb Game!

*The Beginnings of a Financial Literacy Game *

I made this mistake before, so with this I hope that people starting out with game development won’t make the same. And I’m talking about skipping the discovery phase of the development process. Don’t make this mistake. Don’t fall into thinking that an idea is easy to put in the garbage after finding out with a prototype that it’s not going to work.

See, I thought before that I was being smart with my first game by starting off with prototyping the idea to see if it actually works first but the key thing I missed is that the prototype itself will take a lot of time. For a lack of a better term, there was a lot of dancing around because I knew the idea and I had the vision, but of course it just wasn’t clear. I mistakenly didn’t plan it out. And again, it was my first game. So without even defining and analyzing the scope of the whole game, I ended up taking on things that were too much for my skills at the time, making things worse. I’m stubborn so I painfully finished but I did ended up taking a step back. You though, don’t have to make the same mistake and be able to release more games.

So it’s official. I’m committing to my next game idea and it will be about financial literacy. And yes, I’m only committing because I have done the proper documenting and planning. This time, I have a game design document about all the rules and descriptions for my game, such as the mechanics and the user experience. The overall visual and flow (feature image of this log) for the game is planned.

Of course, I will stick with my low poly art because they are manageable as a solo developer and there’s beauty in its simplicity. Also, keeping my skills in mind throughout this phase, I feel a lot more confident with the programming I will be putting myself through. I have my milestones set up and strategy to hopefully build a community around this game. All of which every game developer should discover and plan before moving into producing the game.

I’ve provided a document blueprint to help with the discovery phase and here is the link as I quickly just made it seem as if this whole phase will be easy peasy, but it will take time. And its crucial time needed in the whole process to prevent wasting resources when all that was needed was a scope and a plan for the game. Good luck with your journey and wish me luck with mine!

https://renzrivero.itch.io/alpha-omnipresence Play Store App Store

Alpha Omnipresence is a hyper casual and planetary smash ’em up about brute strength survival against firepower. Use your surroundings to maneuver into advantageous positions and shove enemies off of your planet.

One Finger Control: Easily unleash your strength and quick decision-making.

Unlock and Upgrade Yourself: Collect coins and complete objectives to improve your chances for survival with powerups!

Various Environments: Show your dominance in different worlds each with its own unique soundtrack available on most streaming platforms

New Content Incoming: As the game is regularly updated, there are always new planets, new features or planets named after fans of the game (check the about page in-game for more information).

Collection: Each planet is a NFT (Non-fungible Token) collectible on OpenSea

Find out more about the game here