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Dark Dimension

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A member registered Sep 23, 2014 · View creator page →

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A project needs to be available in some form to be indexed and be visible in searches. If it’s in development it can have demo files available for download.

The page is still public and can be shared on other sites.

For more information you can read Getting indexed on Search & Browse.

From what I can see, there are no downloads tied to that project, which would be why it is not indexed.

Your project was published less than a day ago. It is not unusual for a project to take a day before it is indexed. It takes a bit longer for the first paid project of a creator, as that needs some additional manual review by an admin.

I would suggest to wait a bit longer, maybe an extra day. It won’t make a difference in how popular a game will be. Plus your page is already public, so you can start sharing it on other social media already.

Questions & Support is for support about the Itch.io site itself. If you need help about a specific project, you should ask the developer of that project directly, or post on that project’s page.

Each game is different, there could be numerous things going on that create this issue, which is impossible to identify unless someone is familiar with that project.

I can find your project by searching for “a\vros”. Could you confirm if that’s the case on your end?

Fun game! I like the playful pixel art, combined with the up-beating music.

Looking forward to see what it will look like once it’s finished.

Having a lot of views and fewer sales is normal, and happens everywhere.

Your product has been public for 3 days, and it already has a sale .. that’s incredible! If you don’t have an established fanbase, earning sales is something that happens slowly over time.

I’m not sure what your experience is with publishing, but a good rule of thumb is, for every project out there with a thousand downloads, there are a thousand projects with 1 download.

Over time, establish a fanbase, be vocal on social media about your work, and it will become easier to get new projects to more eyes out there.

If you are uploading them through the web browser, could you confirm that you are using different file names for both zip files?

If you are using butler instead, could you confirm that you are using a different channel name?

The only “disadvantage” is that it allows you to do a lot more in your project page. This means that if you are not sure what you are doing, you might accidentally disable features, or make your page less good-looking.

A good example is, changing the appearance of your page, moving things around, but suddenly when someone views your page from a mobile device, half of the page is not shown correctly, and some elements are hidden behind others.

Another disadvantage (and possibly the reason you have to request custom CSS manually) is for consistency. Once a user views your page, they will likely expect certain things to be in certain places. If with CSS you move things around, some users might spend more time than usual looking around.

Other than that, there is no direct disadvantage, only what you may cause indirectly.

You published the project less than an hour ago. It usually takes a day or maybe two for a project to get indexed. It can take longer during weekends and bank holidays.

My only concern about your project is that it only offers 2 PDF files for download. Maybe that’s why it was de-indexed initially? I’ll mention it to an admin, in case that was the problem.

I really liked Celestia Ludenberg from the first one. She seemed the most “unreal” character at first, at least to me, and I loved that when you get to know her she becomes more and more human.

Also her being the ultimate Gambler was so interesting, it’s so fun picturing her with that appearance sitting on a casino and gambling away.

I’m not gonna mention more details, to avoid spoilers.

The reason I wanted to contact this person in particular is because I’ve seen some of their other reviews and they appear well read and give great feedback.

I still think it’s a bad idea. If you want feedback, you can get it from people that are willing to give it. But that’s just my opinion, at the end of the day, it’s your decision how to approach this.

I did consider the Get Feedback page but in the rules it said “Itch projects only” and this isn’t a project so I figured my post would be struck with the mod hammer.

“Project” is a generic term, it applies to asset packs as well, and anything that has an Itch.io page. As a mod I’ve seen asset packs being posted there, and let them be. People like interacting with them, so it helps the community.

Alternatively you could try the 2D Art or 3D Art.

Usually contacting people privately because they posted a review in one of your games, is a bad idea. If a person decided to review your project without providing any text, that’s their decision.

I would advice you to let it go. If you are looking for feedback for your project, you can post on Get Feedback, or if you have the budget, hire a testing company.

There is no private messaging on Itch.io, but you can join the Discord Server to be able to chat with others.

Every time you upload a file to a project, you can mark it as “This is a demo file and can be downloaded for free”. As far as I’m aware, there’s no limit on how many files can be marked like that.

Hope that’s what you were looking for :)

but it didn’t came from those who have purchased it.

How do you know this? Do you personally know every person that purchased it? Did you maybe download some files yourself? Could it be that one of the buyers decided to re-download the project, or whatever reason?

Paid projects have to be approved by an admin to be indexed, so maybe an admin downloaded it. Not sure if that would show up in the analytics.

If it’s a new game, it will appear there automatically. If it’s your first paid title, it might take a bit longer as it needs manual approval by an admin.

If it’s a game that has been uploaded for a while, but was just finished and released, make a new devlog marked as “Major Update”. That will mark your project to go through a similar process as if it was being uploaded for the first time.

Congratulations on the release! Publishing your first project is a massive first step, wish you all the success with it!

There is the Become a Sponsor page, which as far as I understand, you can pay Itch to display your ads around the site.

As far as I’m aware, this is not affecting search results, and there is no way to pay to help your project rise to the top artificially.

Hope this helps!

I can’t message them to ask about it because Itch.io doesn’t seem to have a private message option.

I just want to point out, that usually approaching people that give you a bad review is not a very good idea. This may not be possible on Itch, but I’d advice to avoid doing that if you are using other platforms that make this possible, especially in a private conversation.

As others mentioned, that is the life of an indie dev. In fact, this is the life of any creative person. There is no popular project out there with no negative comments/reviews. If anything, if your project has a mix of positive and negative reviews, then you are on the right step! Users are more likely to review a negative experience than a positive one.

At least this is my opinion. Try to find a popular youtube video with no dislikes, and I might change my mind :)

The short answer is:

  • Be involved in the community, interact with others, help people asking questions. This might not be about you, but people will get to know you.

  • Share progress on social media. Every time you have something to share, show pictures, screenshots, unfinished content. Every start is slow, keep doing it for a few months, and you will slowly get some people interested.

  • Participate in jams, at least if can take criticism. People will look at your project and rate it based on others they’ve played.

There’s plenty more ways, but hopefully the ones I mentioned above will help on how to approach the next step.

As far as I’m aware the tax interview happens pretty much instantly. I don’t recall any waiting for manual approve.

Having said that, the interview checks that all the data follow a specific format, it has no way of knowing if everything is accurate, as that responsibility falls on each creator.

Hope that helps, looking forward to seeing your paid projects around :)

I doubt that would happen automatically. I think there’s a way to add that on your page’s description manually, but I’m not familiar with the steps.

I can see the link visible. If you click the “More information”, it appears on the “Links” part.

It’s always a good idea to read the rules of a board before posting, especially this one:

Before you create a topic asking why you can’t find your game in Search or Browse READ THIS: https://itch.io/docs/creators/getting-indexed. If you still need to create a topic about it, then please write in your post that you read the docs and you still have a question, otherwise we’ll close your topic.

Long story short, it’s always a good idea to wait a couple of days before your project is indexed. This gets a bit longer on weekends, or if this is your first project.

Your project is still public, and accessible through the link as you’ve mentioned, so you can still market it on other social media.

Yes, this is possible. After uploading a file, you can select the following option:

[ ] This file is a demo and can be downloaded for free

This will mark your project as having a free demo, and also show it on results when users are looking for games with demos.

Hope this helps

Make sure to read the rules of each board before posting, especially this one:

Advertising links to your discords/twitch/etc. not allowed

It’s always a good idea to read the rules of a board before posting. The rules of General Discussion state:

SELF PROMOTION:

If you’re advertising a game, then don’t post here. Use the Release Announcements board to self promote your itch.io projects. Follow the rules there when posting.

You can post it there, but make sure to read the rules to ensure it all goes smoothly. Hope that helps :)

Self-promotion on unrelated threads is against the rules.

Self-promotion on unrelated threads is against the rules.

Make sure to read the rules of each board before posting. Self-promoting projects on external sites is not allowed in General Discussion.

Users expect indie projects on Itch.io, games made by a single dev (or a small team) while they have a full time job. There’s all kinds of projects here. Although this is a personal opinion, I would say that users looking for indie games are for the most part looking for a unique experience, something creative and innovative, that would be too risky for a big company to implement. So make sure to let your creativity flow.

Steam is higher profile, with a higher bar of entry. That’s a platform AAA companies also use, so your game will sit next to other high profile games. It’s easy for a user to judge your project with AAA standards.

I was wondering about the practice of uploading an incomplete demo and gradually updating it over time till completion and polish. I am aware that some devs do indeed do this but I’m wondering about how it’s perceived as a practice. I don’t want to give the impression that I’m a sloppy dev who uploads unfinished work.

It happens often. An indie dev doesn’t have the resources to publish something only when it’s finished, so it’s very often the case that they upload work in progress and keep updating it.

I would say, uploading a game in early stages, and steadily update it looks more hard working, than uploading a finished product once and never updating it, at least in the Indie scene.

A part of me simply feels impatient and wants to upload something for people to play so I can get as much feedback as possible, but another part wants to build a reputation as a hard working dev that cares about quality.

Nobody will judge you or remember you from one game, especially your first one. You need at least 2-3 successes before people start noticing who you are and your reputation.

I’ve never posted a game to itch.io before and would ideally like to go in armed with knowledge.

Uploading your very first game is a massive step. I would say go for it. The only thing you’d need to keep in mind is to be perfectly clear to potential users that the project is unfinished. There is an option to set the project as “In Development”, but also mention in the description that this is a work in progress.

Hope that helps, good luck and looking forward to seeing your projects around :)

I’ve let an admin know. It’s unusual to wait 58 days for a payment, but you mentioned some other issues that potentially delayed it. An admin would know all the details and they can help you further.